In 1982, while competing in the Rusty Harris contest in Whittier, California, Rodney Mullen debuted an ollie on flat ground, which he had adapted from Gelfand's vertical version by combining the motions of some of his existing tricks. Mullen used a "see-saw" motion, striking the tail of the board on the ground to lift the nose, and using the front foot to level the board in mid-air.[2] While Mullen was not initially impressed with his flat ground ollie, and did not formally name it, he realized it opened up a second, elevated plane on which to perform tricks.[citation needed]
Whatever you do, don’t give up. Keep trying. If what you’re doing isn’t working, try something new. Skateboarding is all about experimenting with new ideas and finding out what works. Keep tweaking your results until you get what you want. Watch as many trick tip videos as you can, get advice from good skaters, and remember to enjoy yourself. If you don’t give up and you keep trying, eventually you’ll master the Ollie. Don’t let it frustate you, it takes time and lots of practice.
Don’t get your hopes shot if it takes you a while to get this down.  Once you know how to ollie, beginner skateboarders you can do any trick in the book with just a little bit of practice.  Once you get this trick down while your stationary, go practice while moving around a little bit, try to hop off a couple of curbs.   You’ll be skateboarding like a pro in no time.  Just keep at it.

There are other types of ollies that you can do either alongside or combine with the ones listed above, like the tailgrab, indy grab, melon grab, stalefish, tweak, and dolphin nose. All of those skateboard tricks are performed more or less how they sound, but you might want to watch some videos on youtube to see a pro in action (as well as awesome cat videos).


The wheels of a skateboard are usually made of polyurethane, and come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger diameters (55–85 mm) roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement and are better for transition skateboarding. Smaller diameters (48–54 mm) keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity which allows for a better response time, but also make for a slower top speed and are better for street skateboarding. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer "A" scale. Again like car tires, wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the "B" or "D" scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer medium-sized wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are harder (A 100/A 101). Vertical ramp or "vert" skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually slightly softer (A 98/ A 99), allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.
The Rimable Complete 22″ Skateboard is the most compact street board that are ready-to-use.  It is best for exercise and fun, and very portable.  There are five colors that you can choose from Black, Blue, White, Purple, and Green.  It has high-quality construction, with a high-density plastic deck.  It features extremely smooth 59mm wheels along with ABEC7 bearings and solid aluminum trucks.  It measures 22″ long and 6″ wide and weighs 4 pounds.  It has the best rating of 4.3 on Amazon.

Slide your front foot forward – You remembered to angle your front ankle right? Good, now use that to move your board forward in one big rolling motion, and bring your back leg up into your chest. All of this is done at the same time, but it takes practice to get the timing down. Don’t slide your foot out too early though, or you’ll end up with a pretty weak jump, but also, don’t slide it out too late, or it won’t get leveled and you’ll end up in the pavement. Come to think of it, just do it perfect the first time and everything will be great.


It wouldn’t be until the early 1980’s however, that a man named Rodney Mullen fully developed the skateboard ollie and brought it into vogue. Competing in the Rusty Harris contest in Whittier, California in 1982, Rodney Mullen used a back and forth motion on his skateboard to strike the back end of the board on the ground and using the front end to level the board out in mid-air – all from a flat surface. The audience’s jaws collectively hit the ground.
In the case that you didn't gave up after a hundred over tries, you'll start to develop a reaction to landing it. After a few hundred more tries, you'll feel you are getting off the ground and getting little air. And once you reach the thousandth try, you'll already be doing it whilst rolling and the next thousandth tries will be spent on clearing small cracks n obstacles and working towards ollieng up bigger obstacles n up ledges.
GREAT board. Great design graphics. The boards deck has a real POP to it that makes it GREAT for tricks and a AWESOME beginner board. Only problem is It's super slow and requires a lot of work to maintain speed or to pick up speed period. A simple $20 wheel barring upgrade will fix that and BOOM PERFECT board, PERFECT caved in deck. Only 4 stars because of the lack of speed. I prefer my boards ready out of the box already pre-upgraded, but for the price, no point in complaining. Like almost all new boards, u have to ajust the wheels and the flex of the board to customize it to your liking. You won't regret it. But order it with some "Lucky" or "Red bearings" and your set. 
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