A rushed take-off might be the problem here. Steps 2-4 of this trick tip could help you out. In order to make your feet “stick” to the board, you have to do the movement fluidly. But don’t stress yourself out! You should rather start with some preliminary exercises until you feel safe while ollieing. It is also important to pull your foot up to your board’s nose in a straight manner to prevent it from spinning.
The Enjoi Whitey Panda deck features Resin 7 Construction. Resin 7 Construction uses 100% Canadian maple veneer with a specialized Epoxy resin Glue. These boards are individually pressed which helps insure you get the same concave and curvature in every deck - making your deck more consistent and your tricks more consistent. Why is it better? Compared to a traditional deck it's stronger and offers better pop and longer deck life.

So with your back foot, you want to kick the tail of your board down and right when it touches the ground you jump in the air off your back foot.  This is the ‘pop’.  It takes a little bit of getting used to but most beginners don’t really understand that initially, your back foot is doing most of the work.  Then bring your knees up to your chest after the jump, the higher up you pull your knees the higher up your skateboard can go!
Regardless of your skating ability or style, CCS is the definitive place for the best skateboard decks around. With hundreds in stock, take your pick from some of the sickest decks available! Alien Workshop, Baker, Deathwish, Element, enjoi, Girl, Welcome. WKND, Santa Cruz, Primitive, and Real are among the most popular offered. Additionally, notable brands such as Almost, DGK, Flip, Krooked, Alien Workshop, Skate Mental, Zero, Creature, and Chocolate are available for all your skating needs.

Each skateboard wheel is mounted on its axle via two bearings. With few exceptions, the bearings are the industrial standard "608" size, with a bore of 8 mm (or 10mm depending on the axle), an outer diameter of 22 mm, and a width of 7 mm. These are usually made of steel, though silicon nitride, a high-tech ceramic, is sometimes used. Many skateboard bearings are graded according to the ABEC scale. The scale starts with ABEC1 as the lowest, followed by 3, 5, 7, and 9. It is a common misconception that the higher ABECs are better for skateboarding, as the ABEC rating only measures tolerances, which do not necessarily apply to skateboards. Bearing performance is determined by how well maintained the bearings are. Maintenance on bearings includes periodically cleaning and lubricating them [1]. Bearings that are kept unmaintained have their performance greatly lowered and will soon need to be replaced. Bearing cleaning kits are commonly available on the market. The ABEC rating does not determine the speed or durability of a skateboard bearing. In particular, the ABEC rating says nothing about how well a bearing handles axial (side-to-side) loads, which are severe in most skateboard applications. Many companies do not show the ABEC rating, such as Bones Bearings, which makes bearings specifically for skateboarding, often marketed as "Skate Rated". Each bearing usually contains 7 steel or ceramic bearing balls, although other configurations are used as well.
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The wheels of a skateboard are usually made of polyurethane, and come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger diameters (55–85 mm) roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement and are better for transition skateboarding. Smaller diameters (48–54 mm) keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity which allows for a better response time, but also make for a slower top speed and are better for street skateboarding. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer "A" scale. Again like car tires, wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the "B" or "D" scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer medium-sized wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are harder (A 100/A 101). Vertical ramp or "vert" skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually slightly softer (A 98/ A 99), allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.
Low ollies: This can happen for a lot of reasons, but the biggest one is that you are not crouching low enough before your ollie, and not pulling your feet high enough after you jump. When you crouch down, try and touch the ground. When you jump, try to hit yourself in the chest with your knees. ​Both knees. Don’t worry about falling. That will happen sometimes – that’s just part of skateboarding! For more help, read the How Can I Make My Ollies Higher? FAQ
There are other types of ollies that you can do either alongside or combine with the ones listed above, like the tailgrab, indy grab, melon grab, stalefish, tweak, and dolphin nose. All of those skateboard tricks are performed more or less how they sound, but you might want to watch some videos on youtube to see a pro in action (as well as awesome cat videos).
You can learn to ollie while standing stationary, or while your skateboard is rolling. Ollying while standing still works the same way as while rolling, but I think rolling ollies are easier than stationary ollies. If you would like to learn to ollie with your skateboard stationary, you can place your skateboard on some carpet or grass to keep it from rolling. If you prefer to learn to ollie while your skateboard is rolling, don’t go very fast at the start. Whichever way you learn to ollie, once you feel comfortable you should try to ollie the other way as well.
The Fakie is almost the same thing as a regular ollie-pop, but instead of going forward, the skater is going backwards when they pop the board up in the air, usually performed when you’re in a switch stance. A switch stance is when your feet are in the opposite stance of how you normally would stand, like when you write with your left hand instead of your right (if you’re right-handed).
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