There are other types of ollies that you can do either alongside or combine with the ones listed above, like the tailgrab, indy grab, melon grab, stalefish, tweak, and dolphin nose. All of those skateboard tricks are performed more or less how they sound, but you might want to watch some videos on youtube to see a pro in action (as well as awesome cat videos).

It comes with a plastic board deck, which is small in size, making it ideal for riders who need a really sturdy skateboard. It is more suitable for both experts and beginners who want to learn new tricks in skateboarding. The fact that it is stable and small makes it good for kids, too. It promotes ease in riding and controlling it in a crowded street. This complete skateboard is lightweight, too, allowing you to carry it almost everywhere.
Regardless of your skill level, you definitely need quality skateboard parts and that begins with skateboard trucks. We carry hundreds of top-selling skate trucks! Hardcore skateboarders love our Independent skate trucks for their performance and durability. You can also pick out the perfect skateboard wheels, like a blazing fast set of Spitfires, and you'll be one step closer to skating like a pro. To make the most of your skate wheels, you'll need quality skate bearings, too—check out top-seller Bones Bearings. When building a skateboard, even the smallest choices make a difference, so be sure to get the right size skate hardware, double-check your skateboard bushings, and don't forget to grit up your board with grip tape.

Hey guys. I’m having a real problem with shifting my ollies. I’ve taken videos of myself in slow-mo and asked people to tell me of my shoulders rotate. They said that they stay where they are. My board always turns whenever I ollie, up to 90 degree turns. I think it might be the way I slide my foot. I’ve noticed that it may circle behind me a bit. And I’ve tried to correct it but just can’t. Any help?


It is a mini-cruiser, which is known for its strength as well as its ability to offer real value for the money you spent. This skateboard can also be expected to deliver an impressive performance – thanks to the Abec 7 skatro bearings used in it. There are also 59-mm urethane wheels and the 3-inch GOLD aluminum trucks that can help smoothen each ride.

Cruiser - The name says it all. If you are looking to cruise around town then this is the right complete skateboard for you. These decks vary in length from between 20 inches all the way up to about 40 inches. The wheel diameters usually start at about 55 millimeters and use a much softer urethane than the previous Popsicle decks. These also come with all of the above but the decks do not always need grip tape. Some of the decks are plastic or composite material with grooves or gripping built directly into the deck mold. 
I’ve been skating for about 3-4 years, I can kickflip, pop shuv it, front shuv, 180 and almost heelflips. I can ollie and used to be very good at them and could get them clean, but when I started practicing kickflips, it made my slide all weird. I can still ollie ( though it’s not as clean) but now when I ollie I slide with my pinky toe and that region, instead of the side of my foot. How can I fix my slide? When I try practicing sliding with the side of my foot, it doesnt feel like I can turn my foot that far towards the board and when I do it slowly to see what im doing, i still slide with my toes.Thank you.
In 1982, while competing in the Rusty Harris contest in Whittier, California, Rodney Mullen debuted an ollie on flat ground, which he had adapted from Gelfand's vertical version by combining the motions of some of his existing tricks. Mullen used a "see-saw" motion, striking the tail of the board on the ground to lift the nose, and using the front foot to level the board in mid-air.[2] While Mullen was not initially impressed with his flat ground ollie, and did not formally name it, he realized it opened up a second, elevated plane on which to perform tricks.[citation needed]
Bought for my 7yo's first real board, and for the price its perfect. Beginners look no further! Sure the trucks, bearings, and wheels are my choice, but as someone whose ridden for 20+ years, guarantee these items are way above Walmart status and are more than capable for you shred park or street. Bonus that it came no put together, can teach the little clone how to put it all together.
Hey guys. I’m having a real problem with shifting my ollies. I’ve taken videos of myself in slow-mo and asked people to tell me of my shoulders rotate. They said that they stay where they are. My board always turns whenever I ollie, up to 90 degree turns. I think it might be the way I slide my foot. I’ve noticed that it may circle behind me a bit. And I’ve tried to correct it but just can’t. Any help?
Skateboarding is the best and worst thing that’ll you’ll ever have the pleasure of tearing your hair out over. In a typical day of skating, you’ll get hurt, you’ll get incredibly frustrated, and eventually land a trick that’ll make it all worth it - if you’re lucky. Choosing a skateboard is fairly simple if you know what shape and width you like. If you’ve been skating awhile, you’re probably fairly familiar with what board brands you like skating. If not, there are a number of resources to help you choose the best skateboard for your skating style. Continuing to read this little spiel is going to take the least amount of effort on your part.

The switch stance ollie uses a similar body motion, but the nollie is subtly distinct: For one, the rider is always moving forward, with the body positioned in a nollie stance--closer to the nose and with the front foot on the nose. Secondly the rider usually postures the body differently so as to compensate for this stance with respect to the forward motion. The rider presses the nose down using their front foot to engage the "pop" motion in order for the board to rise. This is In contrast to a "Fakie Ollie" where the pop motion is performed by the rear foot on the tail, similarly to a normal Ollie, however the rider is traveling backwards when performing a Fakie Ollie. Where in a Nollie the rider is traveling forward with their front foot on the nose to apply the initial force "pop".
Krown burst on to the skate scene back in 1996 with the idea to provide a high quality skateboard to the rider on a budget. Krown recognized a big gap between the $20 big box retail skateboard and the $150 professional grade skateboard. The boards at big box retail stores have plastic wheels and don’t even roll! Krown’s idea to bring a price-point skateboard to the market that actually functions as a skateboard has proven to be successful after more than 20 years. With more than 20 years of industry knowledge and knowhow, Krown is able to source the best parts at the best prices, which allows Krown to pass the savings on to the consumer. This expertise has allowed Krown to venture into the world of skateboards, longboards, helmets, pads, and even tools. Krown is the best place to start for beginner and intermediate riders!
A rushed take-off might be the problem here. Steps 2-4 of this trick tip could help you out. In order to make your feet “stick” to the board, you have to do the movement fluidly. But don’t stress yourself out! You should rather start with some preliminary exercises until you feel safe while ollieing. It is also important to pull your foot up to your board’s nose in a straight manner to prevent it from spinning.
The skater can gain greater clearance from the ground by jumping higher, popping faster, sliding the front foot farther forwards (starting the jump with the front foot farther back), and pulling the legs higher into the chest to raise the feet higher. Skaters attempting record-setting ollies even contort the legs so that board and feet are not directly below them, allowing the board to rise at or just below the level of the pelvis.
When you’re searching for one of the best skateboard decks on the market, it’s important to not go overboard. You don’t need one that is made from the rarest wood or has the most unique design. The best boards may be the ones that balance cost, design and quality. Afterall, with healthy use, you’ll eventually have to replace your deck anyway. You want the one that will give you the most functionality and happiness while you use it.
The wheels of a skateboard are usually made of polyurethane, and come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger diameters (55–85 mm) roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement and are better for transition skateboarding. Smaller diameters (48–54 mm) keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity which allows for a better response time, but also make for a slower top speed and are better for street skateboarding. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer "A" scale. Again like car tires, wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the "B" or "D" scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer medium-sized wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are harder (A 100/A 101). Vertical ramp or "vert" skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually slightly softer (A 98/ A 99), allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.

4 amazing skateboards in one nice lot. 1. 1990's Tony Hawk Conplete Skateboard, original falcon 3 design. With Rekon trucks and firelite classic wheels. 2. Sk8mafia Lucero deck. Signed by John Lucero. Brand new deck. 3. 1031 deck signed by entire team on a brand new creepy crawl deck. 4. Brand new super rare Big Mess deck with Blast design. This deck is extremely rare and is a must have for any collector. Both the signed decks are personalized to a guy named Jason that owned a skate shop here in Grant's Pass Or. Those guys were on his wall for a long time before he went out of business. If you have any questions or concerns please let me know. Thanks for looking. Steve
A skateboard is moved by pushing with one foot while the other remains on the board, or by pumping one's legs in structures such as a bowl or half pipe. A skateboard can also be used by simply standing on the deck while on a downward slope and allowing gravity to propel the board and rider. If the rider's leading foot is their right foot, they are said to ride "goofy;" if the rider's leading foot is their left foot, they are said to ride "regular." If the rider is normally regular but chooses to ride goofy, they are said to be riding in "switch," and vice versa. A skater is typically more comfortable pushing with their back foot; choosing to push with the front foot is commonly referred to as riding "mongo", and has negative connotations of style and effectiveness in the skateboarding community.
But there isnt a magic key or secret. Skateboarding is suprisingly a lot of brute force. That is, there is no magic secret, it’s practice practice practice. If you wanna learn any trick, keep trying that trick. There are of course proper techniques and improper, but theyre nigh impossible to describe effectively. it’s all about feel and a lot of tricks defy description.

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Finally, just roll away. If this sounds simple, then great – get out there and practice! If this sounds too complicated, don’t worry. Just go slow, and take your time. There is no time limit to learn how to ollie – some people learn in a day, and I know one guy that took over a year to learn how to ollie on his skateboard. Also, like with most things in skateboarding, your body is learning how to ollie more than your mind is. So, with practice, you’ll eventually get it.
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