It looks simple but yet complicated and vice versa. It takes most weeks to months to learn n some even years but a lifetime of effort to be consistent and be perfect at it and able to go higher, faster and further. It is not a feat you achieve once and it can be thrown out of the window if you want to continue to skate well. I've know skateboarders who just does ollies, boned ollies, ollie north and ollie souths, fakie ollies, switch ollies and nollies and nothing else but everytime he's popping them over 3ft height and up ledges, over gaps and down stair sets or over handrails. So no one's gonna argue on that even though he's not bustin some new fangled pressure flip late flip revert or something. He gets mad street creds for those huge ollies.
The Fakie is almost the same thing as a regular ollie-pop, but instead of going forward, the skater is going backwards when they pop the board up in the air, usually performed when you’re in a switch stance. A switch stance is when your feet are in the opposite stance of how you normally would stand, like when you write with your left hand instead of your right (if you’re right-handed).
So the proper foot placement for the ollie is with the ball of your back foot horizontal on the tail of your skateboard.  And your front foot centered on your board right behind the front trucks.  You may find that moving your feet around in different positions are more comfortable.  This is fine,  everybody can learn how to skateboard their own way.
Bought as a Christmas gift for our nephew. He's not an expert or anything so I was looking for something that would work while he gets used to riding one. When I received it I pulled it out of the package to check it out and the construction was good. The wheels spun smoothly and the grip tape was nicely put on. I don't know how it would resist to some board slides but for a 15 year old just starting out its a good board.
The Moose Blank Skateboard deck is a made with a 7-ply composition and features Canadian Maple wood. The board is 8.25 inches in length, but Moose Blank offers shorter boards as well, fitting men and women of just about any size and skill. The deck itself has a modern concave, making turning a breeze for beginners and pros. The nose and tail are particularly steep for tricks - “perfect for shredding,” says Blank Moose. Although this board is 100 percent blank, Moose Blank offers stains and dips for monochromic board designs as well. There are also Moose Blank sets for sale, which provide a set of blank decks at a discount.
The DreadXBoards Concave Skateboard has Plastic Deck Injection Molded for excellent durability. It features Urethane Wheels 59mm 78a, aluminum trucks, and Abec 7 Bearings. It is completely assembled and is ready to ride. It is perfect for beginners or experienced riders. It can load up to 185 lbs. It is great for kids and adults. It has an excellent rating of 4 on Amazon.
Hey Isak I’m a 46 year old Street Skateboarder recently started Skateboarding a few months back I’m trying to get my Ollies down I’ve stopped Skating for the last couple of weeks because I was getting frustrated with not getting my Ollies I was in a funk confidence slightly knocked so I’m thinking of going Street Skating all day tomorrow and not caring about what others think it’s all in my mind I know I can do this but may mind says I’m going to slam I skate alone but shouldn’t make any difference I need help with motivation somebody give me a kick up the ass you are never to old to start Skateboarding help dudes?! Mark UK. 🙂
A skateboard consists of a deck, trucks, wheels, bearings, hardware, and griptape. All parts come in a variety of sizes, graphics, colors, and signature pro series. The deck is the essential part of any skateboard. The deck ranges generally from 7.5" to 8.5". Skaters choose their board size for many reasons, but the basic deciding factor comes down to style of skating and foot size. Transition skaters usually ride a wider deck, while street skaters tend to go with a smaller deck. Skate brands such as Girl, enjoi, and Welcome offer a wide range of boards in regards to sizes and graphics. Skateboard trucks come in either a high or low setting, and also in a range of widths. The main factors in a truck, are how well they turn, and how well they grind. Independent, Venture, and Thunder, are truck brands that are well known for their turning and grinding capabilities. The skate hardware is generally either Phillips head or Allen key bolts. The skateboard wheels range from 50mm to 60mm. Some brands offer smaller and larger sizes, but 50-60mm is the general range. Like the deck sizes, wheel sizes depend on the skater's choice of terrain: Transition skaters tend to ride bigger wheels, while street skaters usually go with smaller wheels. Bones, Spitfire, Ricta, and Wayward wheel companies all make wheels for any terrain, whether you're a street shredder or a park burner. Skate bearings follow the ABEC rating system, which includes grades 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9. Bones, Bronson, and Andale are some of the top bearing brands in the skate market. CCS proudly carries all these brands, and many more.
When looking at skateboarding’s history, the only thing that’s stayed the same is the overall structure: every board consists of four skateboard wheels, two skateboard trucks, and a riding surface of some kind. And while we’ve come a long way from the days of metal and clay wheels, some aspects of skateboarding - like the brands manufacturing some of the most trusted products - haven’t changed at all. Independent Trucks has been designing trucks since 1978. Powell Peralta, the company responsible for Powell Skateboards, Bones Wheels, Bones Bearings, and the Bones Brigade also started in 1978. NHS, Inc., the company that produces Santa Cruz Skateboards, Independent Trucks, Bronson Speed Bearings, Krux trucks, Flip Skateboards, Ricta Wheels, Mob Grip, and OJ Wheels started in 1973. It’s no wonder these brands are still doing so well - they’ve been with skateboarding since the beginning. Since the day skateboarding went from something surfers did when the waves were flat to its own sport that involves technique, practice, and careful consideration, a small handful companies have been there to help skateboarding become what it is today.
Hi, I can do an Ollie for 1 month already but somehow my Ollie is always unbalanced, meaning the front nose pops much higher than the back wheel. I understand that this is due to my front foot not sliding up higher, but I’m not sure how to correct it because my foot seem to get stuck after sliding up about an inch. Is it because of wrong technique or lack of calf muscles?
This was a simple purchase. No issues at all and the skateboards are really nice! Some people have said it comes unassembled, that's not the case. I ordered 2 different boards and both came assembled and ready to roll.. The boards are topped with grip tape and trucks and wheels were assembled perfectly. If I had a need to get another board I would run straight back to this kit, they are great!
The Element Quadrant #14 board is 8-inches wide and 31.75-inches long, from nose to tail. This deck features a bare top that needs grip tape and a design on the bottom with four quadrants featuring the Element symbol in alternating red and black backgrounds. The wheelbase between the trucks is just over 14 inches while the nose is 7 inches and the tail is 6.325. 

A skateboard is moved by pushing with one foot while the other remains on the board, or by pumping one's legs in structures such as a bowl or half pipe. A skateboard can also be used by simply standing on the deck while on a downward slope and allowing gravity to propel the board and rider. If the rider's leading foot is their right foot, they are said to ride "goofy;" if the rider's leading foot is their left foot, they are said to ride "regular." If the rider is normally regular but chooses to ride goofy, they are said to be riding in "switch," and vice versa. A skater is typically more comfortable pushing with their back foot; choosing to push with the front foot is commonly referred to as riding "mongo", and has negative connotations of style and effectiveness in the skateboarding community.
The ollie is a fundamental trick in street skateboarding, and is used to leap onto, over, or off obstacles, or over gaps of unfriendly terrain such as grass or stairs. As so many other tricks depend on it - for example the kickflip and heelflip - the ollie is often the first trick to be learned by a new skateboarder. The ollie typically takes considerable practice to learn.
beginner skateboarder beginner skateboarders beginner skateboarder tips beginner skateboarding tricks common ollie mistakes get better at skateboarding get more pop how to kickflip how to ollie how to skateboard improve at skateboarding kickflip kickflip trick tip landing tricks consistently learn how to ollie learn how to skateboard ollie higher overcoming fear popping tricks higher pop shuvit pop tricks higher secrets of skateboarding skateboarding skateboarding chickenfoot skateboarding secrets skateboarding tips skateboarding tricks skateboarding trick tips skateboard tricks skateboard tricks for beginners skateboard trick tips skatepark skatepark tips style matters skateboarding tricks for beginners trick tips trips for beginner skateboarders
Smile and wave – Feel free to look around at all the other people at the skatepark that stood by and marveled at your new-found accomplishments (all one of them). I’m sure by this point you’ll be picking up roses that are being thrown at your feet, and taking a well-deserved bow as they begin to chant your name. Take it all in, thank the crowd for their undying affection, and then go get a snow-cone. You deserve it, champ.
×