A skateboard deck is made up of curved layers of wood that are combined with glue. Then, the skateboard deck is trimmed down to a board shape that is practical. Trucks are typically made of aluminum or other metal alloys. They are made by melted metal formed by a mold and later drilled into the skateboard deck. The wheels are formed the same way, but with polyurethane. They are attached by ball bearings to complete the product.
This board includes professional assembly. All Krown skateboards arrived assembled and ready to ride straight out the box. The Rookie model includes heavy duty Aluminum 5.0 trucks, 52mm 99A high-rebound urethane wheels, precision speed Abec 7 bearings, high tensile phillips head mounting hardware, and 80 grit black grip tape. Each component meets the industry standards and are a common choice of skaters worldwide.
Any serious skateboarder will tell you that the ollie is the most fundamental skateboard trick. In fact, it's probably the first trick that you'll learn on your skateboard. They’re great for getting over obstacles, moving around on your board, or just looking cool. Know the right way to move your feet on the board and with a little bit of practice, you can learn to pull off the perfect ollie.

Slide your front foot as soon as you start jumping. Use the same movement you have been practicing to slide your foot towards the top end of the board, just as you jump off it and kick the back down. The front of your board should lift up as you slide your foot along it, with your foot hitting the top of the board at the highest point of your jump.[9]
I’ve been skating for about 3-4 years, I can kickflip, pop shuv it, front shuv, 180 and almost heelflips. I can ollie and used to be very good at them and could get them clean, but when I started practicing kickflips, it made my slide all weird. I can still ollie ( though it’s not as clean) but now when I ollie I slide with my pinky toe and that region, instead of the side of my foot. How can I fix my slide? When I try practicing sliding with the side of my foot, it doesnt feel like I can turn my foot that far towards the board and when I do it slowly to see what im doing, i still slide with my toes.Thank you.

A skateboard consists of a deck, trucks, wheels, bearings, hardware, and griptape. All parts come in a variety of sizes, graphics, colors, and signature pro series. The deck is the essential part of any skateboard. The deck ranges generally from 7.5" to 8.5". Skaters choose their board size for many reasons, but the basic deciding factor comes down to style of skating and foot size. Transition skaters usually ride a wider deck, while street skaters tend to go with a smaller deck. Skate brands such as Girl, enjoi, and Welcome offer a wide range of boards in regards to sizes and graphics. Skateboard trucks come in either a high or low setting, and also in a range of widths. The main factors in a truck, are how well they turn, and how well they grind. Independent, Venture, and Thunder, are truck brands that are well known for their turning and grinding capabilities. The skate hardware is generally either Phillips head or Allen key bolts. The skateboard wheels range from 50mm to 60mm. Some brands offer smaller and larger sizes, but 50-60mm is the general range. Like the deck sizes, wheel sizes depend on the skater's choice of terrain: Transition skaters tend to ride bigger wheels, while street skaters usually go with smaller wheels. Bones, Spitfire, Ricta, and Wayward wheel companies all make wheels for any terrain, whether you're a street shredder or a park burner. Skate bearings follow the ABEC rating system, which includes grades 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9. Bones, Bronson, and Andale are some of the top bearing brands in the skate market. CCS proudly carries all these brands, and many more.


The DAPANLA deck is 7.5-by-31-inches in size, on the smaller side of good quality, real skateboard decks, which makes it ideal for smaller and shorter people. Unlike many decks on the market today, the DAPANLA deck comes with non-slip grip tape on the top. The underside of the deck is similarly decorated, with a range of DAPANLA designs including the fun cartoon avocado board that is sure to turn a few heads for its uniqueness. 
    Almost no one lands an ollie on their first try.  Repetition is the most important part of learning how to ollie.  Once you learn how to do an ollie, you can try doing them while rolling.  Learning is one of the funnest parts of skateboarding.  After you learn ollies, you can move onto 180s, Pop Shove-Its, and flips.  Soon a whole world of tricks will open up.

Skateboard hardware is used to connect the skateboard trucks to the skateboard deck. Skateboard hardware refers to the bolts and locknuts used when building a board. The bolts can have an Allen or Phillips head. Skateboard hardware comes in many different lengths, and often includes one different colored bolt so that the rider can mark the nose of their board.


A skateboard consists of a deck, trucks, wheels, bearings, hardware, and griptape. All parts come in a variety of sizes, graphics, colors, and signature pro series. The deck is the essential part of any skateboard. The deck ranges generally from 7.5" to 8.5". Skaters choose their board size for many reasons, but the basic deciding factor comes down to style of skating and foot size. Transition skaters usually ride a wider deck, while street skaters tend to go with a smaller deck. Skate brands such as Girl, enjoi, and Welcome offer a wide range of boards in regards to sizes and graphics. Skateboard trucks come in either a high or low setting, and also in a range of widths. The main factors in a truck, are how well they turn, and how well they grind. Independent, Venture, and Thunder, are truck brands that are well known for their turning and grinding capabilities. The skate hardware is generally either Phillips head or Allen key bolts. The skateboard wheels range from 50mm to 60mm. Some brands offer smaller and larger sizes, but 50-60mm is the general range. Like the deck sizes, wheel sizes depend on the skater's choice of terrain: Transition skaters tend to ride bigger wheels, while street skaters usually go with smaller wheels. Bones, Spitfire, Ricta, and Wayward wheel companies all make wheels for any terrain, whether you're a street shredder or a park burner. Skate bearings follow the ABEC rating system, which includes grades 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9. Bones, Bronson, and Andale are some of the top bearing brands in the skate market. CCS proudly carries all these brands, and many more.
Longboard - A longboard is similar to a cruiser in terms of overall use and getting around town. Longboards start at about 42 inches in length and about 9 inches in width. When you buy a longboard, the wheel base of the trucks is usually wider and they have wheels starting at roughly 60mm. This gives you more maneuverability and a very smooth ride.
The Wasatch Imports Good Skateboards is the ultimate compact and complete street board that is ready-to-go. It is great for exercise and fun. It is very portable and perfect for all skill levels. It has a variety of awesome vintage color combinations that you can choose from. It is made of topline construction, with a high-density plastic deck, 59mm super smooth wheels, ABEC7 bearings, and solid aluminum trucks. It measures 22″ long and 6″ wide and weighs 4 pounds. It has a  full manufacturer’s lifetime warranty on all parts, pieces, and materials. It has a weight limit of 200 pounds which can ensure that bigger skaters can join the fun.
The Bamboo Skateboards Galaxy Series Cosmic Cloud Skateboard Deck is an excellent option. This concave board is made exclusively of a bamboo hybrid, rather than pure maple. This means the deck is lighter, stronger, more flexible and can even absorb shock better. The non-carbonized, light-wood deck is made of 6-ply wood and is in its fourth generation of designs.
It's a neat piece of science art, and it also tells us something interesting. The arrows show us that the force on the skateboard is constantly changing, both in magnitude as well as in direction. Now the force of gravity obviously isn't changing, so the reason that these force arrows are shrinking and growing and tumbling around is that the skater is changing how their feet pushes and pulls against the board. By applying a variable force that changes both in strength and direction, they're steering the board.
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