Hey guys. I’m having a real problem with shifting my ollies. I’ve taken videos of myself in slow-mo and asked people to tell me of my shoulders rotate. They said that they stay where they are. My board always turns whenever I ollie, up to 90 degree turns. I think it might be the way I slide my foot. I’ve noticed that it may circle behind me a bit. And I’ve tried to correct it but just can’t. Any help?


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The ollie is a fundamental trick in street skateboarding, and is used to leap onto, over, or off obstacles, or over gaps of unfriendly terrain such as grass or stairs. As so many other tricks depend on it - for example the kickflip and heelflip - the ollie is often the first trick to be learned by a new skateboarder. The ollie typically takes considerable practice to learn.
Both your height and weight should play an important role when you are choosing a skateboard. You need to find a skateboard, which fits your weight and height. Picking one, which is either too small or too big might only cause you to experience difficulty controlling it, especially if you are still a beginner learning the ins and outs of skateboarding.

It's a neat piece of science art, and it also tells us something interesting. The arrows show us that the force on the skateboard is constantly changing, both in magnitude as well as in direction. Now the force of gravity obviously isn't changing, so the reason that these force arrows are shrinking and growing and tumbling around is that the skater is changing how their feet pushes and pulls against the board. By applying a variable force that changes both in strength and direction, they're steering the board.
Almost every skate shop will have a wall of boards that is either organized by brand, size, or alphabetically. At our CCS skate shop, we have multiple walls of boards that we try and keep ordered alphabetically. A wall of skateboards, at first glance, can be overwhelming, but if you know what size and roughly what brands you like, it should be fairly easy for you to figure out what board you want. Now would be a good time to mention our CCS Skateboard Buyer’s Guide, specifically the Decks Guide. In the CCS Decks Guide, you’ll find all the information you need to gain a basic understanding of skateboard decks.
GREAT board. Great design graphics. The boards deck has a real POP to it that makes it GREAT for tricks and a AWESOME beginner board. Only problem is It's super slow and requires a lot of work to maintain speed or to pick up speed period. A simple $20 wheel barring upgrade will fix that and BOOM PERFECT board, PERFECT caved in deck. Only 4 stars because of the lack of speed. I prefer my boards ready out of the box already pre-upgraded, but for the price, no point in complaining. Like almost all new boards, u have to ajust the wheels and the flex of the board to customize it to your liking. You won't regret it. But order it with some "Lucky" or "Red bearings" and your set.
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