I’ve been skating for about 3-4 years, I can kickflip, pop shuv it, front shuv, 180 and almost heelflips. I can ollie and used to be very good at them and could get them clean, but when I started practicing kickflips, it made my slide all weird. I can still ollie ( though it’s not as clean) but now when I ollie I slide with my pinky toe and that region, instead of the side of my foot. How can I fix my slide? When I try practicing sliding with the side of my foot, it doesnt feel like I can turn my foot that far towards the board and when I do it slowly to see what im doing, i still slide with my toes.Thank you.
Grip tape is a sheet of paper or fabric with adhesive on one side and a surface similar to fine sandpaper on the other. Grip tape is applied to the top surface of a board to allow the rider's feet to grip the surface and help the skater stay on the board while doing tricks. Grip tape is usually black, but is also available in many different colors such as pink, red, yellow, checkered, camo, and even clear. Often, they have designs die-cut to show the color of the board, or to display the board's company logo. Grip tape accumulates dirt and other substances that will inhibit grip, so use of a grip eraser or rubber eraser is necessary after riding through mud or with dirty shoes.
But there isnt a magic key or secret. Skateboarding is suprisingly a lot of brute force. That is, there is no magic secret, it’s practice practice practice. If you wanna learn any trick, keep trying that trick. There are of course proper techniques and improper, but theyre nigh impossible to describe effectively. it’s all about feel and a lot of tricks defy description.
Playwheels Disney Skateboard For Kids is a 21″ Wood single kicktail deck with painted edges.  It has clear sand spray top grip with color graphic and full-color bottom graphics with a retro shape.  It features multi-colored composite truck and baseplate components with carbon steel axles.  This is great for kids who are starting to learn skating.  It has an average rating of 4.2 on Amazon.
It wouldn’t be until the early 1980’s however, that a man named Rodney Mullen fully developed the skateboard ollie and brought it into vogue. Competing in the Rusty Harris contest in Whittier, California in 1982, Rodney Mullen used a back and forth motion on his skateboard to strike the back end of the board on the ground and using the front end to level the board out in mid-air – all from a flat surface. The audience’s jaws collectively hit the ground.
Maybe you're new to skateboarding. We have lots of complete skateboards or longboards to get you started. All of our skateboard and longboard completes come fully assembled, so you can hit the streets without any of the hassle—try an Enjoi skateboard complete or check out our selection of Sector 9 longboard and skateboard completes. Or maybe you're an experienced skater looking to update and customize your ride. You probably want to start with the perfect skateboard deck before you do anything else. We carry high-quality skate decks to keep you steady and balanced while you bomb, slide, and carve the streets. We also have a variety of longboard decks in stock if you're looking for a smooth ride for cruising or commuting.
The KPC Series Pro Skateboard measures 8.0” x 32”. This is a common width most often associated with pro skateboarders. Wider and stronger than the rookies, this model is the perfect size for someone who is better at skating and looking for an upgrade from the rookie models. The pro features a modern concave which allows for not only comfort, but more pop making it easier to learn tricks.
If a skateboard deck is turned over to its design side, there are two complete T-shaped pieces of metal. This piece is attached to the skateboard deck with screws. The pin is a long piece of metal that is designed to turn the skateboard deck. Adjusting its tension affects the skateboard deck's turning sensitivity. Typically, longboards have looser tension than other skateboards to allow deeper turns.
Large power is created at the point of action by applying small power to the point of effort. Application of this concept to skateboarding makes the back wheels the fulcrum, the tail the point of effort, and the nose the point of action. Applying power to the tail causes the nose to shoot upwards. When the front foot of the skater levels the nose at a point roughly horizontal to the ground in anticipation of the tail, soon to be leveled likewise by the skater’s back foot, the process smoothly done creates the illusion of the skateboard ‘sticking’ to the feet.

Smile and wave – Feel free to look around at all the other people at the skatepark that stood by and marveled at your new-found accomplishments (all one of them). I’m sure by this point you’ll be picking up roses that are being thrown at your feet, and taking a well-deserved bow as they begin to chant your name. Take it all in, thank the crowd for their undying affection, and then go get a snow-cone. You deserve it, champ.
Skateboarding, in one form or another, has been around since the late 1950’s when the first brave pioneer first attached roller skate wheels to a piece of wood. As skateboarding progressed to mimic surfing, skateboards evolved with the style of riding. Skateboards grew and changed shapes as riders experimented with everything from plastic to fiberglass to aluminum constructions - all in an effort to push what was possible. Like most sports or art forms, progression is at the heart of skateboard innovation.

So now that you have an idea of what size and shape board you like, it’s time to choose a brand. A popular size is an 8.5 skateboard deck. If you were looking for a size 8.5 skateboard deck, you could narrow the decks offered on CCS.com to fit in the 8.25 - 8.5 range. This will show you all the boards in that range, and significantly reduce the boards you have to look through. Now, if you don’t have a preference on board brands, find a graphic you like and you’re all set. If this is your first skateboard or are still learning about what wood and brands you prefer, we recommend checking out a CCS Skateboard. They give you a bang for your buck, that's for sure.


Made with bamboo and fiberglass, this board is tough, flexible and ready for anything. The construction is designed to feel and act like a snowboard. The drop-through design is perfect for freestyle longboarding, commuting, carving, pumping and more. It gives you better stability and more wheel clearance. The board is definitely best designed for carving but tricks and kicks are easily done as well.
In general an axle width should be chosen that is close to the width of the deck it will be used with.[8] For example, a 7.75" wide deck will usually be fitted with trucks that have axles between 7.5" wide and 8.0" wide. (Standard truck axle nut size is 5/16"-24tpi UNF, and the thinner "jam" style with an optional nylon lock.) Trucks that are too wide can make doing tricks difficult and can cause the wheels to get in the way when the skateboard is being ridden. Trucks that are too small can be hard to maintain stability and can cause wheel bite to occur when turning.
The wheels of a skateboard are usually made of polyurethane, and come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger diameters (55–85 mm) roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement and are better for transition skateboarding. Smaller diameters (48–54 mm) keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity which allows for a better response time, but also make for a slower top speed and are better for street skateboarding. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer "A" scale. Again like car tires, wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the "B" or "D" scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer medium-sized wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are harder (A 100/A 101). Vertical ramp or "vert" skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually slightly softer (A 98/ A 99), allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.
If you’ve ever watched a skateboarder roll down the street and then all of a sudden pop into the air on a skateboard, you’re probably wondering the same question a lot of people do: how on earth do they do that? It almost seems magical how they just seem to explode off the ground, and then just kind of float. Skateboarder, meet, the ollie. It’s not in the category of “easy skateboard tricks,” but if you learn how to ollie, you’re well on your way to fame and fortune as a professional skater.
Rails (or ribs), are narrow strips of plastic or metal that are attached under the deck lengthwise along the edges. They are used for additional grip for grabs, and to enhance sliding while protecting the deck's graphics at the same time. Rails also provide a more consistent feel for slides, as the slide of a regular skateboard will suffer from the wear of the paint or varnish on the bottom of the board. Although rarely used anymore, they are useful for experienced skaters that are capable of grabs.
Made with bamboo and fiberglass, this board is tough, flexible and ready for anything. The construction is designed to feel and act like a snowboard. The drop-through design is perfect for freestyle longboarding, commuting, carving, pumping and more. It gives you better stability and more wheel clearance. The board is definitely best designed for carving but tricks and kicks are easily done as well.
Level out on the way down – Before you start to head back towards the safety of the earth, level your feet out as the board begins to fall. If you’re trying to jump a gap on your board, this will help you keep going straight and maintain your momentum. Alternatively, you can land on your nose or tail and perform a manual out of the jump, but those are pretty advanced moves. Might want to wait until those little pink training wheels are off your board first.

The Quest Super Cruiser is made of Canadian Maple and measures 31″(787mm)x8″(203mm). It has a maximum capacity of 500 lbs. The wheels have a size of 1.99″(50mm)x1.42″(36mm) Pu with logo printing. The pattern is heat transferred. The trucks are 5″ heavy duty aluminum alloy. This skateboard can provide you a high-quality ride with an entry-level price. This is the best skateboard for both beginners and price-conscious expert skaters. It has an average rating of 4.3 on Amazon.


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The ollie is a fundamental trick in street skateboarding, and is used to leap onto, over, or off obstacles, or over gaps of unfriendly terrain such as grass or stairs. As so many other tricks depend on it - for example the kickflip and heelflip - the ollie is often the first trick to be learned by a new skateboarder. The ollie typically takes considerable practice to learn.

Invented in the late 1970s by Alan "Ollie" Gelfand, the ollie has become a skateboarding fundamental, the basis for many other more complicated tricks. In its simplest form, the ollie is a jumping technique that allows skaters to hop over obstacles and onto curbs, etc. What's so amazing about the ollie is the way the skateboard seems to stick to the skater's feet in midair. Seeing pictures of skaters performing soaring 4-foot ollies, many people assume that the board is somehow attached to the skater's feet. It's not. What's even more amazing about the ollie is that to get the skateboard to jump up, the skater pushes down on the board! The secret to this paradoxical maneuver is rotation around multiple axes. Let's take a closer look.
The wheels of your skateboard can greatly affect your ride in numerous ways, such as the speed, your ability to take control of the skateboard’s movements, and what you feel while riding the board. The good news is that they come in various sizes, levels of durability, and colors, allowing you to pick one that suits your skateboard preference and style.
As you jump into the air, your front foot needs to roll slightly inward, and with the outside of your foot, you want to guide the skateboard as it flies into the air. Some people describe this as dragging the side of your front foot up the skateboard – that’s more or less what is happening, but what you are doing is using your shoe and the grip tape on the board to pull the skateboard higher into the air with you, and guiding the skateboard to where you want it.
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