Finally, just roll away. If this sounds simple, then great – get out there and practice! If this sounds too complicated, don’t worry. Just go slow, and take your time. There is no time limit to learn how to ollie – some people learn in a day, and I know one guy that took over a year to learn how to ollie on his skateboard. Also, like with most things in skateboarding, your body is learning how to ollie more than your mind is. So, with practice, you’ll eventually get it.
Hey, welcome to the blog! My name is Billy and I've been a skateboarder now for over a decade. I know how hard it can be when learning new tricks. That’s why I decided to put up this site – to help beginner skaters find success. If you want to learn how to land skateboard tricks that will shock and amaze your friends, you've come to the right place. Bookmark this blog and come back often to learn how you can skateboard like a pro.

This board includes professional assembly. All Krown skateboards arrived assembled and ready to ride straight out the box. The Rookie model includes heavy duty Aluminum 5.0 trucks, 52mm 99A high-rebound urethane wheels, precision speed Abec 7 bearings, high tensile phillips head mounting hardware, and 80 grit black grip tape. Each component meets the industry standards and are a common choice of skaters worldwide.
As you jump into the air, your front foot needs to roll slightly inward, and with the outside of your foot, you want to guide the skateboard as it flies into the air. Some people describe this as dragging the side of your front foot up the skateboard – that’s more or less what is happening, but what you are doing is using your shoe and the grip tape on the board to pull the skateboard higher into the air with you, and guiding the skateboard to where you want it.
Hey guys. I’m having a real problem with shifting my ollies. I’ve taken videos of myself in slow-mo and asked people to tell me of my shoulders rotate. They said that they stay where they are. My board always turns whenever I ollie, up to 90 degree turns. I think it might be the way I slide my foot. I’ve noticed that it may circle behind me a bit. And I’ve tried to correct it but just can’t. Any help?
The Moose Blank Skateboard deck is a made with a 7-ply composition and features Canadian Maple wood. The board is 8.25 inches in length, but Moose Blank offers shorter boards as well, fitting men and women of just about any size and skill. The deck itself has a modern concave, making turning a breeze for beginners and pros. The nose and tail are particularly steep for tricks - “perfect for shredding,” says Blank Moose. Although this board is 100 percent blank, Moose Blank offers stains and dips for monochromic board designs as well. There are also Moose Blank sets for sale, which provide a set of blank decks at a discount.
Crouch down – While you’re standing on the board with your feet in the right position, crouch down closer towards the board. Don’t turn into a hunchback here; keep your back as straight as possible and don’t stick your rear out too far off the board, otherwise you’ll mess the whole thing up. Stay on the balls of your feet too; if you’re more on your toes, you’ll actually move the board in air and land off of it, and no one wants that. If you need to readjust your feet before you jump, just do a little micro-jump to reposition your feet, or shuffle into position. The first way is easier and faster, the second is more awkward and can mess up your shoes.
In general an axle width should be chosen that is close to the width of the deck it will be used with.[8] For example, a 7.75" wide deck will usually be fitted with trucks that have axles between 7.5" wide and 8.0" wide. (Standard truck axle nut size is 5/16"-24tpi UNF, and the thinner "jam" style with an optional nylon lock.) Trucks that are too wide can make doing tricks difficult and can cause the wheels to get in the way when the skateboard is being ridden. Trucks that are too small can be hard to maintain stability and can cause wheel bite to occur when turning.
Ancheer 31″ Pro Skateboards are made of 7-ply maple wood and finished with anti-slip grip tape.  It includes 60mm PU wheels ideal for riders who want to carve out sections, obtain speed and higher off the ground for tricks. It features 6″ Tony Hawk Signature aluminum trucks and 32″ long deck with double kick tail which is ideal for perfecting your favorite tricks.  It comes with ABEC-7 skateboard bearings.  It has style and quality which is expected from the most influential skateboarders of all time.  It is one of the best-rated skateboards on Amazon with a rating of 4.8.

Learn how to ollie off of a ramp: Ramps are a LOT of fun to ollie off of, but they are also a great way to break something if you don't know what you're doing! I have a cousin who almost lost his arm because of how nastily he broke it while ollying off a ramp. But don't let that scare you - if you know what you're doing, ollying off ramps is great!
There are actually several types of skateboards but the most common ones are the longboard, cruiser, and carve skateboards. A longboard is usually at least 33 inches. It is a great mode of transportation and works well for cruising around. The cruiser also works well as a mode of transportation but many consider it more beneficial as it has a shorter skateboard, which promotes ease in transporting around.
In 1982, while competing in the Rusty Harris contest in Whittier, California, Rodney Mullen debuted an ollie on flat ground, which he had adapted from Gelfand's vertical version by combining the motions of some of his existing tricks. Mullen used a "see-saw" motion, striking the tail of the board on the ground to lift the nose, and using the front foot to level the board in mid-air.[2] While Mullen was not initially impressed with his flat ground ollie, and did not formally name it, he realized it opened up a second, elevated plane on which to perform tricks.[citation needed]

It’s not just standard deck sizes that are available for creating or replacing your board. You can just as easily get a great longboard deck to work on in your basement or garage. One of the best and best reviewed options out there is the Loaded Boards Poke Longboard Skateboard Deck. This standard-design longboard deck has it all to help you make the ideal board. 
Finally, just roll away. If this sounds simple, then great – get out there and practice! If this sounds too complicated, don’t worry. Just go slow, and take your time. There is no time limit to learn how to ollie – some people learn in a day, and I know one guy that took over a year to learn how to ollie on his skateboard. Also, like with most things in skateboarding, your body is learning how to ollie more than your mind is. So, with practice, you’ll eventually get it.
The Rimable Complete 22″ Skateboard is the most compact street board that are ready-to-use.  It is best for exercise and fun, and very portable.  There are five colors that you can choose from Black, Blue, White, Purple, and Green.  It has high-quality construction, with a high-density plastic deck.  It features extremely smooth 59mm wheels along with ABEC7 bearings and solid aluminum trucks.  It measures 22″ long and 6″ wide and weighs 4 pounds.  It has the best rating of 4.3 on Amazon.
I’m 31 and I just started skating too. I can ollie but they fluctuate a lot. I’ll do well certain day and certain day I won’t do well. It’s frustrating sometimes but I’m hooked. I go skating with my 5 year old son. He’s already practicing ollie. I think he’ll out do me soon. Man he picks up so fast like a sponge. Can’t wait till I can get all my basic tricks down so I can have more fun with them!
Whatever you do, don’t give up. Keep trying. If what you’re doing isn’t working, try something new. Skateboarding is all about experimenting with new ideas and finding out what works. Keep tweaking your results until you get what you want. Watch as many trick tip videos as you can, get advice from good skaters, and remember to enjoy yourself. If you don’t give up and you keep trying, eventually you’ll master the Ollie. Don’t let it frustate you, it takes time and lots of practice.

Made with bamboo and fiberglass, this board is tough, flexible and ready for anything. The construction is designed to feel and act like a snowboard. The drop-through design is perfect for freestyle longboarding, commuting, carving, pumping and more. It gives you better stability and more wheel clearance. The board is definitely best designed for carving but tricks and kicks are easily done as well.


The most common shape in skateboarding is called a popsicle shape. It has a curved tail and nose and features concave, which gives the board it’s shape. New skateboarders looking to learn how to carve, push, ollie, kickflip, and grind boxes, ledges, and rails should start with a popsicle shape. If you’re interested in knowing, we explain selecting a board by width, riding style, and board shape in the skateboard decks section of the buyer’s guide.
This board is an excellent option for beginners because of its simplicity and durability. The lightly concave design allows for simple turns but doesn’t require the rider to be an excellent navigator. You can start off riding this deck down the street and use it as you learn ollies, kickflips and how to drop in to a half pipe. It will withstand it all and look good doing it. 

In 1982, while competing in the Rusty Harris contest in Whittier, California, Rodney Mullen debuted an ollie on flat ground, which he had adapted from Gelfand's vertical version by combining the motions of some of his existing tricks. Mullen used a "see-saw" motion, striking the tail of the board on the ground to lift the nose, and using the front foot to level the board in mid-air.[2] While Mullen was not initially impressed with his flat ground ollie, and did not formally name it, he realized it opened up a second, elevated plane on which to perform tricks.[citation needed]
Any serious skateboarder will tell you that the ollie is the most fundamental skateboard trick. In fact, it's probably the first trick that you'll learn on your skateboard. They’re great for getting over obstacles, moving around on your board, or just looking cool. Know the right way to move your feet on the board and with a little bit of practice, you can learn to pull off the perfect ollie.
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