The wheels are also impressive. Unlike some other skateboards that have wheels that are quite stiff, causing them to feel like they will lock up when you ride on them, the wheels in this complete skateboard for beginners are smooth and comfortable. These are also easily controllable, so rest assured that they offer a smooth and friction-free glide.
For sale I have a Powell peralta old school ripper complete red and black with 169mm independent blackout trucks blue cambria 3md 62mm wheels and bones reds bearings The deck has only been skated twice with minor scrapes on the tail and wheel wells I added the independent blackout 69mm trucks and the Cambria wheels im selling it because I’m moving in a different direction I’m building a longboard for myself for this summer anyway the deck is a reissue ripper you can’t get it anymore great overall skater very durable
Krown burst on to the skate scene back in 1996 with the idea to provide a high quality skateboard to the rider on a budget. Krown recognized a big gap between the $20 big box retail skateboard and the $150 professional grade skateboard. The boards at big box retail stores have plastic wheels and don’t even roll! Krown’s idea to bring a price-point skateboard to the market that actually functions as a skateboard has proven to be successful after more than 20 years. With more than 20 years of industry knowledge and knowhow, Krown is able to source the best parts at the best prices, which allows Krown to pass the savings on to the consumer. This expertise has allowed Krown to venture into the world of skateboards, longboards, helmets, pads, and even tools. Krown is the best place to start for beginner and intermediate riders!
There are actually several types of skateboards but the most common ones are the longboard, cruiser, and carve skateboards. A longboard is usually at least 33 inches. It is a great mode of transportation and works well for cruising around. The cruiser also works well as a mode of transportation but many consider it more beneficial as it has a shorter skateboard, which promotes ease in transporting around.
The wheels of a skateboard are usually made of polyurethane, and come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger diameters (55–85 mm) roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement and are better for transition skateboarding. Smaller diameters (48–54 mm) keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity which allows for a better response time, but also make for a slower top speed and are better for street skateboarding. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer "A" scale. Again like car tires, wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the "B" or "D" scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer medium-sized wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are harder (A 100/A 101). Vertical ramp or "vert" skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually slightly softer (A 98/ A 99), allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.
The skateboard has a solid and stiff mini-deck, which is around 22 inches and constructed out of 100% plastic material. Such deck is very lightweight. It is only four pounds but you have an assurance that it can handle up to 198 lbs. of weight. You will also fall in love with the board as it comes in 23 graphics and colors, so picking a favorite is much easier.

Regardless of your skill level, you definitely need quality skateboard parts and that begins with skateboard trucks. We carry hundreds of top-selling skate trucks! Hardcore skateboarders love our Independent skate trucks for their performance and durability. You can also pick out the perfect skateboard wheels, like a blazing fast set of Spitfires, and you'll be one step closer to skating like a pro. To make the most of your skate wheels, you'll need quality skate bearings, too—check out top-seller Bones Bearings. When building a skateboard, even the smallest choices make a difference, so be sure to get the right size skate hardware, double-check your skateboard bushings, and don't forget to grit up your board with grip tape.


The Krown Rookie Skateboard Complete 7.5 comes with thick, sturdy 7-ply maple wood deck. It gives you more control and permits you to perform various tricks. It features carbon steel ABEC-3 bearings, aluminum trucks, bushings and 54mm x 34mm wheels. This board is perfect for kids who are 8 years and older. It has a maximum weight capacity of up to 220 lbs.
This is how I learned how to ollie. Place your skateboard next to a curb, right up against it. This will help keep your board from rolling. Next, do everything that I just described, but don’t worry about what your board does. Just do it, and land up on top of the curb, on the sidewalk. Don’t stress about whether the skateboard will be there, or if you will get hurt – just go through the motions of ollying up the curb. If you do it right, the skateboard will be there. If you do it wrong, you’ll probably just land on your feet on the sidewalk. Here’s the key – just do it and expect it to work. Your body understands what you are trying to do, and the less you stress, the more it can kick in and fill in the blanks.
In general an axle width should be chosen that is close to the width of the deck it will be used with.[8] For example, a 7.75" wide deck will usually be fitted with trucks that have axles between 7.5" wide and 8.0" wide. (Standard truck axle nut size is 5/16"-24tpi UNF, and the thinner "jam" style with an optional nylon lock.) Trucks that are too wide can make doing tricks difficult and can cause the wheels to get in the way when the skateboard is being ridden. Trucks that are too small can be hard to maintain stability and can cause wheel bite to occur when turning.

There are actually several types of skateboards but the most common ones are the longboard, cruiser, and carve skateboards. A longboard is usually at least 33 inches. It is a great mode of transportation and works well for cruising around. The cruiser also works well as a mode of transportation but many consider it more beneficial as it has a shorter skateboard, which promotes ease in transporting around.

New shoes + new board + new grip tape isn’t going to help anything you need to reed what is above bro its an easy how to….bend down push your back foot down make sure the tail snaps off the ground and slid your front foot forward in one swift motion you’ll get it…iv been skating 11 years and its taken me this long to finally land kick flips regularly heel flips and varials my tres are 1 outa 10 still so I practice every day and someday ill be able to land it regularly when I want skateboarding takes alot of patients ALOT so dont think you’re going to learn everything over night just sayin
The DAPANLA deck is 7.5-by-31-inches in size, on the smaller side of good quality, real skateboard decks, which makes it ideal for smaller and shorter people. Unlike many decks on the market today, the DAPANLA deck comes with non-slip grip tape on the top. The underside of the deck is similarly decorated, with a range of DAPANLA designs including the fun cartoon avocado board that is sure to turn a few heads for its uniqueness. 
Slide your front foot forward – You remembered to angle your front ankle right? Good, now use that to move your board forward in one big rolling motion, and bring your back leg up into your chest. All of this is done at the same time, but it takes practice to get the timing down. Don’t slide your foot out too early though, or you’ll end up with a pretty weak jump, but also, don’t slide it out too late, or it won’t get leveled and you’ll end up in the pavement. Come to think of it, just do it perfect the first time and everything will be great.
But, a quick warning! If you learn to ollie while standing still, you can develop some bad habits. Some skaters end up turning in the air a little, and not landing straight. You might not even notice until you try to ollie while rolling. So, if you practice while standing still, I highly recommend also practicing while rolling. Maybe only practice in one spot for a few days - maybe a week or two - and then give the rolling ollie a shot. That way, if you are developing bad habits, you can shake them off before they really mess you up.
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