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This board is an excellent option for beginners because of its simplicity and durability. The lightly concave design allows for simple turns but doesn’t require the rider to be an excellent navigator. You can start off riding this deck down the street and use it as you learn ollies, kickflips and how to drop in to a half pipe. It will withstand it all and look good doing it. 
The official record for the highest flat-ground ollie is 45′ (114.3cm) by Aldrin Garcia during the “Maloof High Ollie Challenge,” held on the 15th of February, 2011. You can watch the movie here. However, a groundbreaking moment in the lore of the ollie will always belong to Danny Wainwright’s ex record of 44.5′ (113.03cm, ELEMENT-HIGHEST OLLIE CONTEST Feb.6th,2000.) Reese Forbes, a competitor of Danny’s in this contest, was also well-known as a master of the ollie.

The longboard, a common variant of the skateboard, is used for higher speed and rough surface boarding, and they are much more expensive. "Old school" boards (those made in the 1970s–80s or modern boards that mimic their shape) are generally wider and often have only one kicktail. Variants of the 1970s often have little or no concavity, whereas 1980s models have deeper concavities and steeper kicktails.[7]


To get higher ollies, I would suggesting resting your back foot on the very end of the tail and the front foot in the middle of the deck to allow for more slide. Popping as hard as you can and catching your board in the groove of the nose with you ankle practically resting in the groove will level the board out in the air. after this initial movement slide you feet back to the bolts on the tail and nose to ensure a clean landing.
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