In general an axle width should be chosen that is close to the width of the deck it will be used with.[8] For example, a 7.75" wide deck will usually be fitted with trucks that have axles between 7.5" wide and 8.0" wide. (Standard truck axle nut size is 5/16"-24tpi UNF, and the thinner "jam" style with an optional nylon lock.) Trucks that are too wide can make doing tricks difficult and can cause the wheels to get in the way when the skateboard is being ridden. Trucks that are too small can be hard to maintain stability and can cause wheel bite to occur when turning.
Large power is created at the point of action by applying small power to the point of effort. Application of this concept to skateboarding makes the back wheels the fulcrum, the tail the point of effort, and the nose the point of action. Applying power to the tail causes the nose to shoot upwards. When the front foot of the skater levels the nose at a point roughly horizontal to the ground in anticipation of the tail, soon to be leveled likewise by the skater’s back foot, the process smoothly done creates the illusion of the skateboard ‘sticking’ to the feet.
Just before a skater performs an ollie, there are three forces acting on the skateboard. One of these forces is the weight of the rider, shown here with two red arrows. Another is the force of gravity on the board itself, shown with a small black arrow. Finally, blue arrows show the force of the ground pushing up on the skateboard. These three forces balance out to zero. With no net force, the skateboard doesn't accelerate, but rolls along at a constant speed.
It wouldn’t be until the early 1980’s however, that a man named Rodney Mullen fully developed the skateboard ollie and brought it into vogue. Competing in the Rusty Harris contest in Whittier, California in 1982, Rodney Mullen used a back and forth motion on his skateboard to strike the back end of the board on the ground and using the front end to level the board out in mid-air – all from a flat surface. The audience’s jaws collectively hit the ground.
It is mainly because those items are guaranteed to help you familiarize yourself with the ins and outs of using them. They are a big help in making you feel comfortable when you push off with your feet while also balancing on top of the board when riding. It is not good to go for a very technical product, so it’s best to choose the mentioned types first.
Invented in the late 1970s by Alan "Ollie" Gelfand, the ollie has become a skateboarding fundamental, the basis for many other more complicated tricks. In its simplest form, the ollie is a jumping technique that allows skaters to hop over obstacles and onto curbs, etc. What's so amazing about the ollie is the way the skateboard seems to stick to the skater's feet in midair. Seeing pictures of skaters performing soaring 4-foot ollies, many people assume that the board is somehow attached to the skater's feet. It's not. What's even more amazing about the ollie is that to get the skateboard to jump up, the skater pushes down on the board! The secret to this paradoxical maneuver is rotation around multiple axes. Let's take a closer look.
Sizing plays an important role in the performance of any deck. A large majority range in size from 7.75" to 8.5" in width. These will provide a great platform for shredding any obstacle and will excel in street and skatepark environments alike. For those who prefer a smaller board, decks are offered down to 7.5" in width- benefiting people with smaller feet or the technical skater. Conversely, those looking for a wider board will enjoy our selection ranging up to 8.9" wide. Larger decks will accommodate those with very large feet, as well as offer an amazing experience for cruising and shredding large ramps and transitions.
Low ollies: This can happen for a lot of reasons, but the biggest one is that you are not crouching low enough before your ollie, and not pulling your feet high enough after you jump. When you crouch down, try and touch the ground. When you jump, try to hit yourself in the chest with your knees. ​Both knees. Don’t worry about falling. That will happen sometimes – that’s just part of skateboarding! For more help, read the How Can I Make My Ollies Higher? FAQ
Just before a skater performs an ollie, there are three forces acting on the skateboard. One of these forces is the weight of the rider, shown here with two red arrows. Another is the force of gravity on the board itself, shown with a small black arrow. Finally, blue arrows show the force of the ground pushing up on the skateboard. These three forces balance out to zero. With no net force, the skateboard doesn't accelerate, but rolls along at a constant speed.
In 1978, Alan Gelfand, who was given his nickname "Ollie" by Scott Goodman, learned to perform no-handed aerials in bowls and pools using a gentle raising of the nose and scooping motion to keep the board with the feet.[2][3] There are numerous references to Alan Gelfand's Ollie with most notably pictures in the 1970s skateboarding magazine "Skateboarder".
Skateboarding started in California in the 1950s.[2] The first skateboards were made from roller skates (attached to a board).[3] Skateboarding gained in popularity because of surfing; in fact, skateboarding was initially referred to as "sidewalk surfing". Initially, skateboards were handmade from wooden boxes and planks by individuals. As the sport became more popular, companies started manufacturing skateboards. Boards are also continuing to evolve as companies try to make them lighter and stronger or improve their performance.
My fiancee purchased this via my account and he says that it has good concave shape and pop.Assembling was fairly simple, easier if you have a box cutter on hand to help with laying the grip tape. The deck was the best part but the bearings were good too. He thought the bushings were the worst, after about two hours of skating, both bushings were crushed and stuck in one direction. He's been skating for almost 13 years. Hope this helps!
Do your Ollie, then, instantly after you pop your board, lift your back foot up to meet your front foot. That helped me solo much I improved twice in a few tries with using that trick. And, if that doesn’t help, it’s just a matter of practicing. If you practice a ly every day, you experiment, you will find u r solution. But, try lifting u r back foot high right after u pop 😉
Pull your knees up into your chest – How far you actually want to pull your legs up is totally up to you, but the higher your feet go, the higher your board will go too. By the way, the highest recorded preferred stance ollie-pop is 45 inches, done by Aldrin Garcia, and the highest switch stance ollie-pop is 40.125 inches, by Gavin Caperton. And if you’re going for endurance rather than height, the record for most consecutive hops is held by Rob Dyrdek, who did 215 of them in a row on his TV show Rob and Big. So those give you something to shoot for.
The top part of the truck is screwed to the deck and is called the baseplate, and beneath it is the hanger. The axle runs through the hanger. Between the baseplate and the hanger are bushings, also rubbers or grommets, that provide the cushion mechanism for turning the skateboard. The bushings cushion the truck when it turns. The stiffer the bushings, the more resistant the skateboard is to turning. The softer the bushings, the easier it is to turn. Bushings come in varying shapes and urethane formulas as well as durometers, which may affect turning, rebound and durability. A bolt called a kingpin holds these parts together and fits inside the bushings. Thus by tightening or loosening the kingpin nut, the trucks can be adjusted loosely for better turning and tighter for more stability (useful when landing tricks). Standard kingpin nut size is 3/8" - 24tpi. The position of the hanger respect to the baseplate is also determined by the pivot, a rod that slots into the corresponding seat in the baseplate. The pivot stops the hanger from rotating around the kingpin. The pivot must allow some movement around the bushings and therefore is not a perfect fit. The space between the pivot and its seat in the baseplate is filled by a pivot cup, a plastic part that will take most of the wear and tear of the pivot and assist in centering the hanger needs to be lubricated every so often.
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I’ve been skating for about 3-4 years, I can kickflip, pop shuv it, front shuv, 180 and almost heelflips. I can ollie and used to be very good at them and could get them clean, but when I started practicing kickflips, it made my slide all weird. I can still ollie ( though it’s not as clean) but now when I ollie I slide with my pinky toe and that region, instead of the side of my foot. How can I fix my slide? When I try practicing sliding with the side of my foot, it doesnt feel like I can turn my foot that far towards the board and when I do it slowly to see what im doing, i still slide with my toes.Thank you.


The Landwalker 22″ Complete Skateboard has a sturdy 7 layer Canadian maple deck. It’s best for downhill, U table and slider because of its enormous stability. This board is best for teens and adults. It comes with Abec 7″ Bearings, PU wheels, Black Grip Tape, and hardware. It measures 79 x 20 x 10 cm. This board is an awesome gift for Christmas or Halloween.
Whatever you do, don’t give up. Keep trying. If what you’re doing isn’t working, try something new. Skateboarding is all about experimenting with new ideas and finding out what works. Keep tweaking your results until you get what you want. Watch as many trick tip videos as you can, get advice from good skaters, and remember to enjoy yourself. If you don’t give up and you keep trying, eventually you’ll master the Ollie. Don’t let it frustate you, it takes time and lots of practice.
Pull your knees up into your chest – How far you actually want to pull your legs up is totally up to you, but the higher your feet go, the higher your board will go too. By the way, the highest recorded preferred stance ollie-pop is 45 inches, done by Aldrin Garcia, and the highest switch stance ollie-pop is 40.125 inches, by Gavin Caperton. And if you’re going for endurance rather than height, the record for most consecutive hops is held by Rob Dyrdek, who did 215 of them in a row on his TV show Rob and Big. So those give you something to shoot for.
In the case that you didn't gave up after a hundred over tries, you'll start to develop a reaction to landing it. After a few hundred more tries, you'll feel you are getting off the ground and getting little air. And once you reach the thousandth try, you'll already be doing it whilst rolling and the next thousandth tries will be spent on clearing small cracks n obstacles and working towards ollieng up bigger obstacles n up ledges.

It wouldn’t be until the early 1980’s however, that a man named Rodney Mullen fully developed the skateboard ollie and brought it into vogue. Competing in the Rusty Harris contest in Whittier, California in 1982, Rodney Mullen used a back and forth motion on his skateboard to strike the back end of the board on the ground and using the front end to level the board out in mid-air – all from a flat surface. The audience’s jaws collectively hit the ground.
So the proper foot placement for the ollie is with the ball of your back foot horizontal on the tail of your skateboard.  And your front foot centered on your board right behind the front trucks.  You may find that moving your feet around in different positions are more comfortable.  This is fine,  everybody can learn how to skateboard their own way.
The Bamboo Skateboards Galaxy Series Cosmic Cloud Skateboard Deck is an excellent option. This concave board is made exclusively of a bamboo hybrid, rather than pure maple. This means the deck is lighter, stronger, more flexible and can even absorb shock better. The non-carbonized, light-wood deck is made of 6-ply wood and is in its fourth generation of designs.

The Fakie is almost the same thing as a regular ollie-pop, but instead of going forward, the skater is going backwards when they pop the board up in the air, usually performed when you’re in a switch stance. A switch stance is when your feet are in the opposite stance of how you normally would stand, like when you write with your left hand instead of your right (if you’re right-handed).
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