Before we show you how to ollie, let’s get familiar with the legends that brought this skateboard trick to the masses.  If it were a person, the history of ollie would start way back in 1974, when Alan Gelfand got his first skateboard from his father after his family moved to Hollywood, Florida from New York state. It didn’t take him too long to get the hang of it; he won the South Florida Skateboard championships two years later.
Low ollies: This can happen for a lot of reasons, but the biggest one is that you are not crouching low enough before your ollie, and not pulling your feet high enough after you jump. When you crouch down, try and touch the ground. When you jump, try to hit yourself in the chest with your knees. ​Both knees. Don’t worry about falling. That will happen sometimes – that’s just part of skateboarding! For more help, read the How Can I Make My Ollies Higher? FAQ
The Powell Golden Dragon 2 Skateboard is an affordable and complete skateboard for the beginners and also for the advanced skaters.  It has high-rebound, hand-cast polyurethane wheels to give you a great roll and grip.  It measures 7.5 inches wide with a colorful screen-printed bottom.  It is made in China and has an average rating of 4.2 on Amazon.

It comes with a plastic board deck, which is small in size, making it ideal for riders who need a really sturdy skateboard. It is more suitable for both experts and beginners who want to learn new tricks in skateboarding. The fact that it is stable and small makes it good for kids, too. It promotes ease in riding and controlling it in a crowded street. This complete skateboard is lightweight, too, allowing you to carry it almost everywhere.
The skater can gain greater clearance from the ground by jumping higher, popping faster, sliding the front foot farther forwards (starting the jump with the front foot farther back), and pulling the legs higher into the chest to raise the feet higher. Skaters attempting record-setting ollies even contort the legs so that board and feet are not directly below them, allowing the board to rise at or just below the level of the pelvis.
Just before a skater performs an ollie, there are three forces acting on the skateboard. One of these forces is the weight of the rider, shown here with two red arrows. Another is the force of gravity on the board itself, shown with a small black arrow. Finally, blue arrows show the force of the ground pushing up on the skateboard. These three forces balance out to zero. With no net force, the skateboard doesn't accelerate, but rolls along at a constant speed.
I’m 31 and I just started skating too. I can ollie but they fluctuate a lot. I’ll do well certain day and certain day I won’t do well. It’s frustrating sometimes but I’m hooked. I go skating with my 5 year old son. He’s already practicing ollie. I think he’ll out do me soon. Man he picks up so fast like a sponge. Can’t wait till I can get all my basic tricks down so I can have more fun with them!

You have all the time in the world to skate, but you don't have the time to build a skateboard yourself. Maybe it's just easier to get a complete skateboard than spend hours in the garage trying to screw on new trucks. Even though customization is awesome, it's not necessary. You just want the freedom of the ride. When you get your skateboard, you just want to be able to get out and ollie off the curb as fast as possible. Which is why Tillys has an awesome selection of complete skateboards for you. Choose from some of your favorite skateboard brands including Primitive and Element and more. The bottom graphics are probably the most important part, so you can definitely choose the one that best fits your style. Get your new complete skateboard right here.


The wheels are also impressive. Unlike some other skateboards that have wheels that are quite stiff, causing them to feel like they will lock up when you ride on them, the wheels in this complete skateboard for beginners are smooth and comfortable. These are also easily controllable, so rest assured that they offer a smooth and friction-free glide.
I just can get any height on my ollie at all! so frustrating!, i can pop the board nicely and get it off the ground like that, but then i try to slide my foot up the board and it just stays at that 45 degree angle from when i popped it, i just can’t seem to slide and get it horizontal in the air, or any height for that matter, i have watched countless ollie tips and tricks videos, and practised for hours on end, the same ollie, i can ride smoothly and fine, along the side-walk for example but i just cant get any grip to bring my board up and forward (i bought a new skateboard yesterday, and also new shoes) so its obviously me which is incompetent in completing this ollie! I know im kind of waffling on a bit, but i just can get the board to get any height! Please help if you can!
Hey, I’m a girl too and I’ve been skateboarding for nearly ten years now. I’m not a pro or anything, but I used to ride around in the local skatepark that was mainly just a big bowl that was fun to just drop into and cruise around in. I’m only just now learning street tricks. Anyways, I’d go there and the dudes would sometimes tease me, but sometimes they’d tease me about it. The thing you gotta do is not give up. Just ignore them. Dudes are stupid. Practice at home, by yourself, and learn some awesome stuff. So when you get really good, you can go to the park and if they start saying bad stuff, show off. It’ll blow them away. It always made me feel really good to show them that I was better than them right after they teased me for it.
My problem is that my board always lands crooked when I Ollie. The worst thing is that I even tell myself to “keep your shoulders straight” while I’m doing the Ollie and I still land crooked. I think it’s just hard for people to grasp the simple fact that everything on a skateboard has to be done horizontally which is odd because people don’t walk sideways. We walk straight. Like roller blading for example…. it’s easier for me to roller blade because I’m used to walking and running obviously except with a skateboard everything is as if you were hopping over a fence sideways. Skateboarding is tough.

EXPERIENCED SKATER! This board is amazing for the price! (notice i said FOR THE PRICE) At the time of this review, the board was $44.40 and for that price the board i got was phenomenal. It is a 7-ply deck with aluminum trucks (havent figured out the bearings but they definitely feel like the abec 5 they claim to be). The trucks arent the best quality out there and the board can be a little thinner (maybe 5-ply) but the overall board is amazing. There are only two complaints. The hole in the wheels is a tiny TINY TIIINYYY bit off center, but nothing that cant be fixed with a new set. I can see what another review said by it not coming assembled, as a couple of the bolts on the wheels are a little loose, but the board does come assembled.
Any serious skateboarder will tell you that the ollie is the most fundamental skateboard trick. In fact, it's probably the first trick that you'll learn on your skateboard. They’re great for getting over obstacles, moving around on your board, or just looking cool. Know the right way to move your feet on the board and with a little bit of practice, you can learn to pull off the perfect ollie.
You can learn to ollie while standing stationary, or while your skateboard is rolling. Ollying while standing still works the same way as while rolling, but I think rolling ollies are easier than stationary ollies. If you would like to learn to ollie with your skateboard stationary, you can place your skateboard on some carpet or grass to keep it from rolling. If you prefer to learn to ollie while your skateboard is rolling, don’t go very fast at the start. Whichever way you learn to ollie, once you feel comfortable you should try to ollie the other way as well.
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