Invented in the late 1970s by Alan "Ollie" Gelfand, the ollie has become a skateboarding fundamental, the basis for many other more complicated tricks. In its simplest form, the ollie is a jumping technique that allows skaters to hop over obstacles and onto curbs, etc. What's so amazing about the ollie is the way the skateboard seems to stick to the skater's feet in midair. Seeing pictures of skaters performing soaring 4-foot ollies, many people assume that the board is somehow attached to the skater's feet. It's not. What's even more amazing about the ollie is that to get the skateboard to jump up, the skater pushes down on the board! The secret to this paradoxical maneuver is rotation around multiple axes. Let's take a closer look.
There are actually several types of skateboards but the most common ones are the longboard, cruiser, and carve skateboards. A longboard is usually at least 33 inches. It is a great mode of transportation and works well for cruising around. The cruiser also works well as a mode of transportation but many consider it more beneficial as it has a shorter skateboard, which promotes ease in transporting around.

So with your back foot, you want to kick the tail of your board down and right when it touches the ground you jump in the air off your back foot.  This is the ‘pop’.  It takes a little bit of getting used to but most beginners don’t really understand that initially, your back foot is doing most of the work.  Then bring your knees up to your chest after the jump, the higher up you pull your knees the higher up your skateboard can go!
Bought as a Christmas gift for our nephew. He's not an expert or anything so I was looking for something that would work while he gets used to riding one. When I received it I pulled it out of the package to check it out and the construction was good. The wheels spun smoothly and the grip tape was nicely put on. I don't know how it would resist to some board slides but for a 15 year old just starting out its a good board.

The KPC Series Pro Skateboard measures 8.0” x 32”. This is a common width most often associated with pro skateboarders. Wider and stronger than the rookies, this model is the perfect size for someone who is better at skating and looking for an upgrade from the rookie models. The pro features a modern concave which allows for not only comfort, but more pop making it easier to learn tricks.
Save time and avoid the hassle of setting up a new skateboard by buying a complete that we’ll build for you. Skate One offers a full range of complete skateboards featuring high-performance wood and composite decks, grip tape, bearings, wheels, trucks, and hardware suitable for men, women, boys and girls of all ages, experience levels, and styles of skateboarding. Whether you're looking for a classic re-issue, cruiser, funshape, longboard, mini, street or skatepark style complete skateboard, we have you covered.
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Land at the same time – Again, this is probably silly to repeat, but you’d be surprised to find out how many people execute a successful jump, and then throw their hands up in the air to celebrate their new-found triumph, and forget the most important part: landing. The best position for your feet to be in is as close to the trucks as possible. Don’t land too close to the nose or tail, or you could end up breaking off those the board itself. Also, remember to bend your knees to absorb the jump. Don’t want to land straight-legged: that’s how kneecaps are destroyed.

But, a quick warning! If you learn to ollie while standing still, you can develop some bad habits. Some skaters end up turning in the air a little, and not landing straight. You might not even notice until you try to ollie while rolling. So, if you practice while standing still, I highly recommend also practicing while rolling. Maybe only practice in one spot for a few days - maybe a week or two - and then give the rolling ollie a shot. That way, if you are developing bad habits, you can shake them off before they really mess you up.
Go for the low truck profile if you want to obtain additional stability when you do flip tricks. It also works well for small wheels. The mid-sized trucks are good for all-around use, especially in streets and parks. You can also choose the high-sized trucks that are good for carving and cruising, which is the reason why they are perfect for huge wheels.
EXPERIENCED SKATER! This board is amazing for the price! (notice i said FOR THE PRICE) At the time of this review, the board was $44.40 and for that price the board i got was phenomenal. It is a 7-ply deck with aluminum trucks (havent figured out the bearings but they definitely feel like the abec 5 they claim to be). The trucks arent the best quality out there and the board can be a little thinner (maybe 5-ply) but the overall board is amazing. There are only two complaints. The hole in the wheels is a tiny TINY TIIINYYY bit off center, but nothing that cant be fixed with a new set. I can see what another review said by it not coming assembled, as a couple of the bolts on the wheels are a little loose, but the board does come assembled.
An Ollie is basically an upward/forward jumping trick. The name “ollie” comes from the nickname of Alan Gelfand who created the ollie in 1976. The ollie was then modified for flat-ground use by Rodney Mullen in 1982, and it is this flat-ground version of the ollie which is most commonly referred to as the ‘ollie’ today. The ollie is arguably the most important trick in skateboarding because it is the foundation of the majority of skateboard tricks which require lift. When you want to do a trick like the kickflip, when you want to get onto something like a ledge, or down something like a set of stairs, or try handrails, the ability to ollie is a necessity. Therefore the ability to ollie high and with good control is critical to your total skateboarding skill-set.
Choosing a skateboard deck is a great place to start when building a complete skateboard. Unless you have experience riding a shaped board - something a little more retro or unusual, we recommend you start with a popsicle shape. CCS carries over 60 different skateboard deck brands that sell this popular popsicle shape. If you have questions on what size you should ride or have any other questions about building a complete, we recommend you check out our Skateboard Buyer’s Guide. Here, you’ll find helpful how-to’s for choosing a skateboard decks, skateboard trucks, skateboard wheels, skateboard bearings, and skateboard components. This guide explains every part of a skateboard and helps you choose which sizes and styles to best suit your needs.
This board is an excellent option for beginners because of its simplicity and durability. The lightly concave design allows for simple turns but doesn’t require the rider to be an excellent navigator. You can start off riding this deck down the street and use it as you learn ollies, kickflips and how to drop in to a half pipe. It will withstand it all and look good doing it. 
I’m 31 and I just started skating too. I can ollie but they fluctuate a lot. I’ll do well certain day and certain day I won’t do well. It’s frustrating sometimes but I’m hooked. I go skating with my 5 year old son. He’s already practicing ollie. I think he’ll out do me soon. Man he picks up so fast like a sponge. Can’t wait till I can get all my basic tricks down so I can have more fun with them!
Pull your knees up into your chest – How far you actually want to pull your legs up is totally up to you, but the higher your feet go, the higher your board will go too. By the way, the highest recorded preferred stance ollie-pop is 45 inches, done by Aldrin Garcia, and the highest switch stance ollie-pop is 40.125 inches, by Gavin Caperton. And if you’re going for endurance rather than height, the record for most consecutive hops is held by Rob Dyrdek, who did 215 of them in a row on his TV show Rob and Big. So those give you something to shoot for.
Crouch down – While you’re standing on the board with your feet in the right position, crouch down closer towards the board. Don’t turn into a hunchback here; keep your back as straight as possible and don’t stick your rear out too far off the board, otherwise you’ll mess the whole thing up. Stay on the balls of your feet too; if you’re more on your toes, you’ll actually move the board in air and land off of it, and no one wants that. If you need to readjust your feet before you jump, just do a little micro-jump to reposition your feet, or shuffle into position. The first way is easier and faster, the second is more awkward and can mess up your shoes.
So with your back foot, you want to kick the tail of your board down and right when it touches the ground you jump in the air off your back foot.  This is the ‘pop’.  It takes a little bit of getting used to but most beginners don’t really understand that initially, your back foot is doing most of the work.  Then bring your knees up to your chest after the jump, the higher up you pull your knees the higher up your skateboard can go!
I found that my problem was unclear instruction about the timing between jumping and popping. One day when I was watching a slowmo ollie video though, I noticed that the skateboarder already was beginning to jump (at least his body was already going in an upward motion) before snapping the board off the ground. That was a critical change I needed to make in order to get it working. I had been trying to pop the board while all my weight was still pushing down on it (kind of an obvious mistake, but I somehow overlooked this). Hope this helps somebody.
Decks come in a variety of shapes and sizes. You can choose a mini-board, a cruiser, a drop-through or a standard deck for your favorite set of wheels and hardware. Widths range too from a few inches with a 22-inch board to the wide size of a true cruiser. Some decks are flat as possible while others are significantly concave for optimized turning. You can buy a deck with artwork and grip tape already attached for a quick install or you can get a bare-bones wooden deck to truly customize.
In fact, we can work out how you need to steer the skateboard. Tracker has a nice feature that we'll call 'force arrows'. These arrows show you how much force acts on an object at every instant, and in which direction the force acts. So for example, if you were to kick a ball into the air, while the ball was mid-flight, this arrow would always point down and be the same length, even though the ball is moving forward. That's because the only force acting on the ball is gravity, which pulls it straight down, and acts with a constant strength. (For those of you who've studied physics, these arrows denote the acceleration of the center of mass, which by Newton's second law is proportional to the net force acting on the skateboard.)
The KPC Series Pro Skateboard measures 8.0” x 32”. This is a common width most often associated with pro skateboarders. Wider and stronger than the rookies, this model is the perfect size for someone who is better at skating and looking for an upgrade from the rookie models. The pro features a modern concave which allows for not only comfort, but more pop making it easier to learn tricks.
In general an axle width should be chosen that is close to the width of the deck it will be used with.[8] For example, a 7.75" wide deck will usually be fitted with trucks that have axles between 7.5" wide and 8.0" wide. (Standard truck axle nut size is 5/16"-24tpi UNF, and the thinner "jam" style with an optional nylon lock.) Trucks that are too wide can make doing tricks difficult and can cause the wheels to get in the way when the skateboard is being ridden. Trucks that are too small can be hard to maintain stability and can cause wheel bite to occur when turning.
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