Bought for my 7yo's first real board, and for the price its perfect. Beginners look no further! Sure the trucks, bearings, and wheels are my choice, but as someone whose ridden for 20+ years, guarantee these items are way above Walmart status and are more than capable for you shred park or street. Bonus that it came no put together, can teach the little clone how to put it all together.

A rushed take-off might be the problem here. Steps 2-4 of this trick tip could help you out. In order to make your feet “stick” to the board, you have to do the movement fluidly. But don’t stress yourself out! You should rather start with some preliminary exercises until you feel safe while ollieing. It is also important to pull your foot up to your board’s nose in a straight manner to prevent it from spinning.


Shock pads are made of polyurethane and rubber. They are very similar to risers but vary in the fact that their sole purpose is to cushion the board from the trucks. Since the trucks are metal and the board wood, whenever the board hits the ground after doing a trick, the energy goes through the truck to the board ─ this has caused boards to crack, split, or even break in half, and shock pads were created to prevent this.

Get used to sliding your front foot up the length of the board. Once you’ve perfected lifting the front of the board up, use your back foot to hold the board in that position. Slide your front foot up the board towards the front, rotating it as you do so. The side of your foot just below the toes should grate along the deck of your board until it reaches the top.[5]

Popsicle - A Popsicle complete skateboard is typically between 30 and 34 inches in total length with a varying width between 6.0 inches wide and 9.25 inches wide. You can check out the deck size chart to pick the complete that will be best suitable for you. These decks all come with grip tape and are a more technical skateboard for tricks and for the skatepark. If you want to do more than cruise the streets, a Popsicle is what you are looking for. All of our complete skateboards include the deck, trucks, wheels, grip, bearings and hardware. They are all also fully assembled. When choosing a complete, typically the more expensive completes will include a higher quality deck, better and longer lasting trucks, upgraded wheels and a higher abec rating on the bearings.
Hey guys. I’m a girl and I am having some trouble with my ollie. I know the steps in order to do an ollie, but I can’t seem to do all of them. I can do a perfect pop on the back foot, but my problem lies in my front foot. (I am regular footed but idk if that matters) I know I just need to get my back wheels off the ground, but when I try to slide it, my foot just stays frozen. I try really hard to make it move, and when it does it just goes straight across, skimming the bottom of my shoes. Even then I can only move it half an inch. I have pretty mild griptape, that might change something? Idk.
Almost is proud to announce a collaboration with Skateistan, the award-winning non-profit organization empowering children and youth through skateboarding and education. They recently launched a new Skate School in Phnom Penh, Cambodia on Friday (February 23rd, 2018). Over 100 children celebrated alongside special guests from around the world, including Almost flow skater Sky Brown. 
Learn how to ollie off of a ramp: Ramps are a LOT of fun to ollie off of, but they are also a great way to break something if you don't know what you're doing! I have a cousin who almost lost his arm because of how nastily he broke it while ollying off a ramp. But don't let that scare you - if you know what you're doing, ollying off ramps is great!

Slam your back foot down on the tail of your skateboard as hard as you can. At that moment, you want to also jump into the air, off of your back foot. This part is key and takes practice. The trick is in getting your timing right. You want to slap the skateboard’s tail down, and as it hits the ground, jump off of that foot into the air. Make sure to pull that back foot high into the air. It's a quick, snapping motion.
If you are completely new to skateboarding, consider taking a minute to read through the Skateboard Decks Section in our Buyer’s Guide will be helpful, but a good rule of thumb is: the bigger your feet, the wider your board should be. If you wear a size 9 and up, you can’t go wrong with buying an 8” board. Narrow boards are easier to flip while wider boards are more stable, but there are no hard and fast rules to skateboarding. The only way to really find out what you like is by trying new shapes, sizes, and brands. Brands like Welcome, Baker, Chocolate, Deathwish, and Element all have a wide variety of sizes, shapes, and graphics.
We’re assuming if you’re trying to learn how to do an ollie, you’re probably pretty new to skateboarding. You may already know whether you’re goofy or regular footed, but if not, try taking a quick hop onto your board with the intention of rolling forward (you might want to try on carpet first so you don’t slip backwards). If you’re left foot naturally ends up towards the front of your board, you’re regular-footed. If you ended up putting your right foot first, you’re goofy-footed.

Ohderii Skate Skateboards are made of a High-quality Plastic deck which will not easily break even when pressed over by a car.  It comes with 3.125″ all aluminum alloy trucks, 59mm 78A super smooth PU wheels and ABEC-7 stainless steel bearings.  It is ready to use and you can easily store it in your backpack.  It has an average rating of 4.5 on Amazon.
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