For sale I have a Powell peralta old school ripper complete red and black with 169mm independent blackout trucks blue cambria 3md 62mm wheels and bones reds bearings The deck has only been skated twice with minor scrapes on the tail and wheel wells I added the independent blackout 69mm trucks and the Cambria wheels im selling it because I’m moving in a different direction I’m building a longboard for myself for this summer anyway the deck is a reissue ripper you can’t get it anymore great overall skater very durable

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Popsicle - A Popsicle complete skateboard is typically between 30 and 34 inches in total length with a varying width between 6.0 inches wide and 9.25 inches wide. You can check out the deck size chart to pick the complete that will be best suitable for you. These decks all come with grip tape and are a more technical skateboard for tricks and for the skatepark. If you want to do more than cruise the streets, a Popsicle is what you are looking for. All of our complete skateboards include the deck, trucks, wheels, grip, bearings and hardware. They are all also fully assembled. When choosing a complete, typically the more expensive completes will include a higher quality deck, better and longer lasting trucks, upgraded wheels and a higher abec rating on the bearings.


The deck is expertly constructed with a vertically laminated bamboo core and bamboo veneer exterior, all attached with triaxial glass and epoxy as well as a course grip tape top. The grip tape is arranged in an unusual and stylish, yet functional design. The 34-inch board features a 13-degree nose angle and a 18-degree tail angle. With its directional shape, you’ll easily be able to cruise on this board or pull a few tricks. It is a lightweight and flexible deck.
The rider begins the ollie by crouching and jumping directly upward. As the rider begins to leap, instead of lifting the feet from the board, he/she "pops" the tail by striking it against the ground, which raises the board nose-first. Maintaining contact with the board, the rider lifts the front leg and bends the front ankle so that the outer or top side of the shoe slides towards the nose of the board. The friction between the shoe and the board's grip tape helps to guide and pull the board upward, while the rear foot only maintains slight contact with board to help guide it. When nearing the peak of the jump, the rider lifts the rear leg and pushes the front foot forward, which levels the board and keeps it in contact with the back foot.
Skateboard hardware is used to connect the skateboard trucks to the skateboard deck. Skateboard hardware refers to the bolts and locknuts used when building a board. The bolts can have an Allen or Phillips head. Skateboard hardware comes in many different lengths, and often includes one different colored bolt so that the rider can mark the nose of their board.
The KPC Series Pro Skateboard measures 8.0” x 32”. This is a common width most often associated with pro skateboarders. Wider and stronger than the rookies, this model is the perfect size for someone who is better at skating and looking for an upgrade from the rookie models. The pro features a modern concave which allows for not only comfort, but more pop making it easier to learn tricks.
The type of skating the rider wants to do will inform the board choice, which sometimes involves skating a non-popsicle shaped board. But if you are just starting out, you can simply start with the traditional popsicle shaped deck that you probably recognize. As you skate more and get to know what shapes you like or what kind of skateboarding you enjoy best, your decisions will take into account for company, shape, width, and style of riding. Until then, choosing a board by its graphic is totally acceptable. For an overview on types of skateboard decks and riding styles, check out our Skateboard Decks Section in our Buyer’s Guide. Once you find a deck you like, you can simply select the default wheels, trucks, bearings and grip tape or you have the option to make it a complete.

The skateboard has a solid and stiff mini-deck, which is around 22 inches and constructed out of 100% plastic material. Such deck is very lightweight. It is only four pounds but you have an assurance that it can handle up to 198 lbs. of weight. You will also fall in love with the board as it comes in 23 graphics and colors, so picking a favorite is much easier.
As you jump into the air, your front foot needs to roll slightly inward, and with the outside of your foot, you want to guide the skateboard as it flies into the air. Some people describe this as dragging the side of your front foot up the skateboard – that’s more or less what is happening, but what you are doing is using your shoe and the grip tape on the board to pull the skateboard higher into the air with you, and guiding the skateboard to where you want it.

Bolted onto the underside of the tail end of a skateboard, the tail guard (also known as a "skid plate") protected the tail end from skid stops and other maneuvers that would otherwise wear away the wood (commonly known as razor tail) and decrease the longevity of the tail. Typically made of plastic, these were widely popular in the '80s but their usage quickly diminished with the arrival of two-tail board designs, which became increasingly popular in the '90s.
Large power is created at the point of action by applying small power to the point of effort. Application of this concept to skateboarding makes the back wheels the fulcrum, the tail the point of effort, and the nose the point of action. Applying power to the tail causes the nose to shoot upwards. When the front foot of the skater levels the nose at a point roughly horizontal to the ground in anticipation of the tail, soon to be leveled likewise by the skater’s back foot, the process smoothly done creates the illusion of the skateboard ‘sticking’ to the feet.
In 1982, while competing in the Rusty Harris contest in Whittier, California, Rodney Mullen debuted an ollie on flat ground, which he had adapted from Gelfand's vertical version by combining the motions of some of his existing tricks. Mullen used a "see-saw" motion, striking the tail of the board on the ground to lift the nose, and using the front foot to level the board in mid-air.[2] While Mullen was not initially impressed with his flat ground ollie, and did not formally name it, he realized it opened up a second, elevated plane on which to perform tricks.[citation needed]
I have been doing ollie’s for about a year to a year and a halve, but thats not the problem. My problem is the board turns when i ollie, i cant help it, i am starting to go into harder ground (ollying off ledges and ollying stairs) but i cant land and ride away because my board has turned in a 45 degree angle and it jerks me off the board, Please help in all you can, cheers mate.

Shop skateboard decks from The House Outdoor Gear for the best selection of skateboard decks and everything else skateboarding. We carry the best skateboard brands around including Real, Baker, Blind, Zero, Enjoi, Welcome, Anti Hero and many more. Our site features skateboard wheels, skateboard trucks, skateboard bearings, and other skateboard accessories. From cruiser skateboards to traditional shapes the skateboard shop at The House Outdoor Gear will have something for everyone. Shop through our selection of the top skateboard decks and find what you’re looking for today.

Crouch down – While you’re standing on the board with your feet in the right position, crouch down closer towards the board. Don’t turn into a hunchback here; keep your back as straight as possible and don’t stick your rear out too far off the board, otherwise you’ll mess the whole thing up. Stay on the balls of your feet too; if you’re more on your toes, you’ll actually move the board in air and land off of it, and no one wants that. If you need to readjust your feet before you jump, just do a little micro-jump to reposition your feet, or shuffle into position. The first way is easier and faster, the second is more awkward and can mess up your shoes.
So now that you have an idea of what size and shape board you like, it’s time to choose a brand. A popular size is an 8.5 skateboard deck. If you were looking for a size 8.5 skateboard deck, you could narrow the decks offered on CCS.com to fit in the 8.25 - 8.5 range. This will show you all the boards in that range, and significantly reduce the boards you have to look through. Now, if you don’t have a preference on board brands, find a graphic you like and you’re all set. If this is your first skateboard or are still learning about what wood and brands you prefer, we recommend checking out a CCS Skateboard. They give you a bang for your buck, that's for sure.
Skateboards can be bought online and in your local stores.  However, choosing a good skateboard can be challenging.  If you are a beginner there are a lot of things that you have to consider.  Aside from the cost, you should also check the entire board such as the wheels, the deck, the trucks, and others.  Here, we have compiled the best skateboards for sale that you can choose from right now.
Ohderii Skate Skateboards are made of a High-quality Plastic deck which will not easily break even when pressed over by a car.  It comes with 3.125″ all aluminum alloy trucks, 59mm 78A super smooth PU wheels and ABEC-7 stainless steel bearings.  It is ready to use and you can easily store it in your backpack.  It has an average rating of 4.5 on Amazon.
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