4 amazing skateboards in one nice lot. 1. 1990's Tony Hawk Conplete Skateboard, original falcon 3 design. With Rekon trucks and firelite classic wheels. 2. Sk8mafia Lucero deck. Signed by John Lucero. Brand new deck. 3. 1031 deck signed by entire team on a brand new creepy crawl deck. 4. Brand new super rare Big Mess deck with Blast design. This deck is extremely rare and is a must have for any collector. Both the signed decks are personalized to a guy named Jason that owned a skate shop here in Grant's Pass Or. Those guys were on his wall for a long time before he went out of business. If you have any questions or concerns please let me know. Thanks for looking. Steve 

The longboard, a common variant of the skateboard, is used for higher speed and rough surface boarding, and they are much more expensive. "Old school" boards (those made in the 1970s–80s or modern boards that mimic their shape) are generally wider and often have only one kicktail. Variants of the 1970s often have little or no concavity, whereas 1980s models have deeper concavities and steeper kicktails.[7]
Each skateboard wheel is mounted on its axle via two bearings. With few exceptions, the bearings are the industrial standard "608" size, with a bore of 8 mm (or 10mm depending on the axle), an outer diameter of 22 mm, and a width of 7 mm. These are usually made of steel, though silicon nitride, a high-tech ceramic, is sometimes used. Many skateboard bearings are graded according to the ABEC scale. The scale starts with ABEC1 as the lowest, followed by 3, 5, 7, and 9. It is a common misconception that the higher ABECs are better for skateboarding, as the ABEC rating only measures tolerances, which do not necessarily apply to skateboards. Bearing performance is determined by how well maintained the bearings are. Maintenance on bearings includes periodically cleaning and lubricating them [1]. Bearings that are kept unmaintained have their performance greatly lowered and will soon need to be replaced. Bearing cleaning kits are commonly available on the market. The ABEC rating does not determine the speed or durability of a skateboard bearing. In particular, the ABEC rating says nothing about how well a bearing handles axial (side-to-side) loads, which are severe in most skateboard applications. Many companies do not show the ABEC rating, such as Bones Bearings, which makes bearings specifically for skateboarding, often marketed as "Skate Rated". Each bearing usually contains 7 steel or ceramic bearing balls, although other configurations are used as well.

Skateboards can be bought online and in your local stores.  However, choosing a good skateboard can be challenging.  If you are a beginner there are a lot of things that you have to consider.  Aside from the cost, you should also check the entire board such as the wheels, the deck, the trucks, and others.  Here, we have compiled the best skateboards for sale that you can choose from right now.


    Almost no one lands an ollie on their first try.  Repetition is the most important part of learning how to ollie.  Once you learn how to do an ollie, you can try doing them while rolling.  Learning is one of the funnest parts of skateboarding.  After you learn ollies, you can move onto 180s, Pop Shove-Its, and flips.  Soon a whole world of tricks will open up.
After you’ve properly applied a burst of force to the tail, the top-side of your front foot’s toe should start dragging up your board almost automatically. Eventually, the higher you are able to bring your front foot during lift will determine the apex of your ollie, so work gradually towards lifting your front foot as high as your body allows. Skateboarders who record the highest ollies usually (somehow manage to!) bring their feet higher than their hips!
Are you on a hunt for the best skateboard on the market today? Then you are in the right place as this comprehensive article is designed to give you information about skateboarding and types of skateboards in general. By learning about the different types of skateboards and what each one can do, figuring out what works for you the best is a lot easier.
Hey Isak I’m a 46 year old Street Skateboarder recently started Skateboarding a few months back I’m trying to get my Ollies down I’ve stopped Skating for the last couple of weeks because I was getting frustrated with not getting my Ollies I was in a funk confidence slightly knocked so I’m thinking of going Street Skating all day tomorrow and not caring about what others think it’s all in my mind I know I can do this but may mind says I’m going to slam I skate alone but shouldn’t make any difference I need help with motivation somebody give me a kick up the ass you are never to old to start Skateboarding help dudes?! Mark UK. 🙂
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When looking at skateboarding’s history, the only thing that’s stayed the same is the overall structure: every board consists of four skateboard wheels, two skateboard trucks, and a riding surface of some kind. And while we’ve come a long way from the days of metal and clay wheels, some aspects of skateboarding - like the brands manufacturing some of the most trusted products - haven’t changed at all. Independent Trucks has been designing trucks since 1978. Powell Peralta, the company responsible for Powell Skateboards, Bones Wheels, Bones Bearings, and the Bones Brigade also started in 1978. NHS, Inc., the company that produces Santa Cruz Skateboards, Independent Trucks, Bronson Speed Bearings, Krux trucks, Flip Skateboards, Ricta Wheels, Mob Grip, and OJ Wheels started in 1973. It’s no wonder these brands are still doing so well - they’ve been with skateboarding since the beginning. Since the day skateboarding went from something surfers did when the waves were flat to its own sport that involves technique, practice, and careful consideration, a small handful companies have been there to help skateboarding become what it is today.
Skateboarding started in California in the 1950s.[2] The first skateboards were made from roller skates (attached to a board).[3] Skateboarding gained in popularity because of surfing; in fact, skateboarding was initially referred to as "sidewalk surfing". Initially, skateboards were handmade from wooden boxes and planks by individuals. As the sport became more popular, companies started manufacturing skateboards. Boards are also continuing to evolve as companies try to make them lighter and stronger or improve their performance.
Shock pads are made of polyurethane and rubber. They are very similar to risers but vary in the fact that their sole purpose is to cushion the board from the trucks. Since the trucks are metal and the board wood, whenever the board hits the ground after doing a trick, the energy goes through the truck to the board ─ this has caused boards to crack, split, or even break in half, and shock pads were created to prevent this.
Hey, I’m a girl too and I’ve been skateboarding for nearly ten years now. I’m not a pro or anything, but I used to ride around in the local skatepark that was mainly just a big bowl that was fun to just drop into and cruise around in. I’m only just now learning street tricks. Anyways, I’d go there and the dudes would sometimes tease me, but sometimes they’d tease me about it. The thing you gotta do is not give up. Just ignore them. Dudes are stupid. Practice at home, by yourself, and learn some awesome stuff. So when you get really good, you can go to the park and if they start saying bad stuff, show off. It’ll blow them away. It always made me feel really good to show them that I was better than them right after they teased me for it.
This ollie is commonly referred to as an “Ollie Nosebone.” First of all, you need good ollie skills. The key for this ollie is your front foot. When you reach the peak, (gently!) push your front foot forward not moving any other part of your body. That’s it, simple yet difficult. Of utmost importance is practicing your regular ollie over and over in various conditions so that extension tricks such as the ‘nosebone’ come almost naturally with experimentation. Nevertheless, here is a movie explaining how to do it.
You can learn to ollie while standing stationary, or while your skateboard is rolling. Ollying while standing still works the same way as while rolling, but I think rolling ollies are easier than stationary ollies. If you would like to learn to ollie with your skateboard stationary, you can place your skateboard on some carpet or grass to keep it from rolling. If you prefer to learn to ollie while your skateboard is rolling, don’t go very fast at the start. Whichever way you learn to ollie, once you feel comfortable you should try to ollie the other way as well.
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