Taotao Girls Skateboards comply to United State Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Standard.  It has a 24″ X 6″ Maple Double Kickside Deck. It features 608Z Bearings, 3.5″ Plastic Truck & Base, and 50 x 30 mm PVC Wheels.  The Safety helmet, Knee and  Elbow Pads also comply to CPSC Standard.  It has a Cool Pink Aloha Graphic Design with an Amazon rating of 4.3.
After that I went to my regular Olley spot to practice, fell so hard three times. My legs were so fucked up from the day before. Now I feel like shit because I had problem with a 20cm ledge I landed at least 100 times up and down yesterday. I’m even capable of 50cm ledges at slow speed, but I only get the front wheel and the board up so I have to put pressure on the nose to get it all the way up.

So you want to know how to ollie? Be warned, it’s not for the faint of heart, and a lot of people have tried and failed and tried some more and still failed and then eventually thrown their boards into a wall out of frustration (I have no idea who those people are). It’s by no means an easy skateboard trick, but if you want to know how to ollie, start with these simple tips:
Hey guys. I’m having a real problem with shifting my ollies. I’ve taken videos of myself in slow-mo and asked people to tell me of my shoulders rotate. They said that they stay where they are. My board always turns whenever I ollie, up to 90 degree turns. I think it might be the way I slide my foot. I’ve noticed that it may circle behind me a bit. And I’ve tried to correct it but just can’t. Any help?
The Enjoi Whitey Panda deck features Resin 7 Construction. Resin 7 Construction uses 100% Canadian maple veneer with a specialized Epoxy resin Glue. These boards are individually pressed which helps insure you get the same concave and curvature in every deck - making your deck more consistent and your tricks more consistent. Why is it better? Compared to a traditional deck it's stronger and offers better pop and longer deck life.
This can be tricky to figure out, so just take your time and relax. The first few times you try and ollie, it helps to not worry about this part. You will end up doing a sort of half-ollie, popping just a little in the air. Or, you might fall! But, don't worry, this is all part of learning. If you want though, you can certainly start with rolling your ankle when you try and ollie - whatever works for you! Eventually, you will need to roll and drag, and you'll figure it out. Just take your time!
Crouch down – While you’re standing on the board with your feet in the right position, crouch down closer towards the board. Don’t turn into a hunchback here; keep your back as straight as possible and don’t stick your rear out too far off the board, otherwise you’ll mess the whole thing up. Stay on the balls of your feet too; if you’re more on your toes, you’ll actually move the board in air and land off of it, and no one wants that. If you need to readjust your feet before you jump, just do a little micro-jump to reposition your feet, or shuffle into position. The first way is easier and faster, the second is more awkward and can mess up your shoes.
From cheap skateboards to high end, custom complete skateboard decks, we have boards for riders of every skill level and tax bracket - we get it, we put skateboarding before everything else first. If you can’t always afford a new board, but go through decks like toilet paper, consider a CCS Skateboard - they cost less, but are manufactured in the same factories as other brands we carry. CCS Skateboards are held to the same standards as every skateboard we sell, but we can sell them for less.
A skateboard deck is made up of curved layers of wood that are combined with glue. Then, the skateboard deck is trimmed down to a board shape that is practical. Trucks are typically made of aluminum or other metal alloys. They are made by melted metal formed by a mold and later drilled into the skateboard deck. The wheels are formed the same way, but with polyurethane. They are attached by ball bearings to complete the product.

So you want to know how to ollie? Be warned, it’s not for the faint of heart, and a lot of people have tried and failed and tried some more and still failed and then eventually thrown their boards into a wall out of frustration (I have no idea who those people are). It’s by no means an easy skateboard trick, but if you want to know how to ollie, start with these simple tips:
The switch stance ollie uses a similar body motion, but the nollie is subtly distinct: For one, the rider is always moving forward, with the body positioned in a nollie stance--closer to the nose and with the front foot on the nose. Secondly the rider usually postures the body differently so as to compensate for this stance with respect to the forward motion. The rider presses the nose down using their front foot to engage the "pop" motion in order for the board to rise. This is In contrast to a "Fakie Ollie" where the pop motion is performed by the rear foot on the tail, similarly to a normal Ollie, however the rider is traveling backwards when performing a Fakie Ollie. Where in a Nollie the rider is traveling forward with their front foot on the nose to apply the initial force "pop".
In 1982, while competing in the Rusty Harris contest in Whittier, California, Rodney Mullen debuted an ollie on flat ground, which he had adapted from Gelfand's vertical version by combining the motions of some of his existing tricks. Mullen used a "see-saw" motion, striking the tail of the board on the ground to lift the nose, and using the front foot to level the board in mid-air.[2] While Mullen was not initially impressed with his flat ground ollie, and did not formally name it, he realized it opened up a second, elevated plane on which to perform tricks.[citation needed]

Invented in the late 1970s by Alan "Ollie" Gelfand, the ollie has become a skateboarding fundamental, the basis for many other more complicated tricks. In its simplest form, the ollie is a jumping technique that allows skaters to hop over obstacles and onto curbs, etc. What's so amazing about the ollie is the way the skateboard seems to stick to the skater's feet in midair. Seeing pictures of skaters performing soaring 4-foot ollies, many people assume that the board is somehow attached to the skater's feet. It's not. What's even more amazing about the ollie is that to get the skateboard to jump up, the skater pushes down on the board! The secret to this paradoxical maneuver is rotation around multiple axes. Let's take a closer look.
To get higher ollies, I would suggesting resting your back foot on the very end of the tail and the front foot in the middle of the deck to allow for more slide. Popping as hard as you can and catching your board in the groove of the nose with you ankle practically resting in the groove will level the board out in the air. after this initial movement slide you feet back to the bolts on the tail and nose to ensure a clean landing.
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