The board also boasts of its reasonably small size and lightweight nature, making it easy to control and ride. In addition, carrying it wherever you want to go is also much easier because of its lightness. It is flexible enough that it can accommodate the needs of different kinds of users, including cruisers, travelers, beginners, expert riders, and kids.
Unlike golf or tennis, skateboarding is a sport where there isn’t a difference between the equipment needed for men and women to compete together. Women skate, flip and bruise just like the guys they’re at the skatepark with. The only consideration women may want to account for is that people who are shorter or smaller often want a shorter board for optimal control. The DAPANLA Skateboard Deck is a great deck that is slightly smaller, but can do it all.  
The ollie is a fundamental trick in street skateboarding, and is used to leap onto, over, or off obstacles, or over gaps of unfriendly terrain such as grass or stairs. As so many other tricks depend on it - for example the kickflip and heelflip - the ollie is often the first trick to be learned by a new skateboarder. The ollie typically takes considerable practice to learn.
The longboard, a common variant of the skateboard, is used for higher speed and rough surface boarding, and they are much more expensive. "Old school" boards (those made in the 1970s–80s or modern boards that mimic their shape) are generally wider and often have only one kicktail. Variants of the 1970s often have little or no concavity, whereas 1980s models have deeper concavities and steeper kicktails.[7]
Both your height and weight should play an important role when you are choosing a skateboard. You need to find a skateboard, which fits your weight and height. Picking one, which is either too small or too big might only cause you to experience difficulty controlling it, especially if you are still a beginner learning the ins and outs of skateboarding.

Longboard - A longboard is similar to a cruiser in terms of overall use and getting around town. Longboards start at about 42 inches in length and about 9 inches in width. When you buy a longboard, the wheel base of the trucks is usually wider and they have wheels starting at roughly 60mm. This gives you more maneuverability and a very smooth ride.
Before we show you how to ollie, let’s get familiar with the legends that brought this skateboard trick to the masses.  If it were a person, the history of ollie would start way back in 1974, when Alan Gelfand got his first skateboard from his father after his family moved to Hollywood, Florida from New York state. It didn’t take him too long to get the hang of it; he won the South Florida Skateboard championships two years later.
You have all the time in the world to skate, but you don't have the time to build a skateboard yourself. Maybe it's just easier to get a complete skateboard than spend hours in the garage trying to screw on new trucks. Even though customization is awesome, it's not necessary. You just want the freedom of the ride. When you get your skateboard, you just want to be able to get out and ollie off the curb as fast as possible. Which is why Tillys has an awesome selection of complete skateboards for you. Choose from some of your favorite skateboard brands including Primitive and Element and more. The bottom graphics are probably the most important part, so you can definitely choose the one that best fits your style. Get your new complete skateboard right here.
Whatever you do, don’t give up. Keep trying. If what you’re doing isn’t working, try something new. Skateboarding is all about experimenting with new ideas and finding out what works. Keep tweaking your results until you get what you want. Watch as many trick tip videos as you can, get advice from good skaters, and remember to enjoy yourself. If you don’t give up and you keep trying, eventually you’ll master the Ollie. Don’t let it frustate you, it takes time and lots of practice.

The laws for skateboarding helmets vary from state to state. Many states require that skaters wear a helmet under a certain age, and some states like California make all skaters under 18 wear a CPSC Certified helmet at all times. CSPC skateboard helmets usually have an EPS protective liner that meets the safety standards for skateboarding. Make sure you check your state's regulations before ordering.
To get higher ollies, I would suggesting resting your back foot on the very end of the tail and the front foot in the middle of the deck to allow for more slide. Popping as hard as you can and catching your board in the groove of the nose with you ankle practically resting in the groove will level the board out in the air. after this initial movement slide you feet back to the bolts on the tail and nose to ensure a clean landing.

A rushed take-off might be the problem here. Steps 2-4 of this trick tip could help you out. In order to make your feet “stick” to the board, you have to do the movement fluidly. But don’t stress yourself out! You should rather start with some preliminary exercises until you feel safe while ollieing. It is also important to pull your foot up to your board’s nose in a straight manner to prevent it from spinning.


Smile and wave – Feel free to look around at all the other people at the skatepark that stood by and marveled at your new-found accomplishments (all one of them). I’m sure by this point you’ll be picking up roses that are being thrown at your feet, and taking a well-deserved bow as they begin to chant your name. Take it all in, thank the crowd for their undying affection, and then go get a snow-cone. You deserve it, champ.
It's a neat piece of science art, and it also tells us something interesting. The arrows show us that the force on the skateboard is constantly changing, both in magnitude as well as in direction. Now the force of gravity obviously isn't changing, so the reason that these force arrows are shrinking and growing and tumbling around is that the skater is changing how their feet pushes and pulls against the board. By applying a variable force that changes both in strength and direction, they're steering the board.
Slam your back foot down on the tail of your skateboard as hard as you can. At that moment, you want to also jump into the air, off of your back foot. This part is key and takes practice. The trick is in getting your timing right. You want to slap the skateboard’s tail down, and as it hits the ground, jump off of that foot into the air. Make sure to pull that back foot high into the air. It's a quick, snapping motion.
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