Sizing plays an important role in the performance of any deck. A large majority range in size from 7.75" to 8.5" in width. These will provide a great platform for shredding any obstacle and will excel in street and skatepark environments alike. For those who prefer a smaller board, decks are offered down to 7.5" in width- benefiting people with smaller feet or the technical skater. Conversely, those looking for a wider board will enjoy our selection ranging up to 8.9" wide. Larger decks will accommodate those with very large feet, as well as offer an amazing experience for cruising and shredding large ramps and transitions.
Ancheer 31″ Pro Skateboards are made of 7-ply maple wood and finished with anti-slip grip tape.  It includes 60mm PU wheels ideal for riders who want to carve out sections, obtain speed and higher off the ground for tricks. It features 6″ Tony Hawk Signature aluminum trucks and 32″ long deck with double kick tail which is ideal for perfecting your favorite tricks.  It comes with ABEC-7 skateboard bearings.  It has style and quality which is expected from the most influential skateboarders of all time.  It is one of the best-rated skateboards on Amazon with a rating of 4.8.
I have skated for about 7 years i took a 2 year break. I have had about 50 boards and from that id say this board is ok seeing as iv had zero's break day one. if your newer to skateboarding and you dont mind the cost i would say go for it. For more hardcore skaters there are some things you should know about this board. im not 100% about the trucks day one just doing kickflips 360 flips smaller gaps.. its a bit shaky i dont think these trucks are make for stairs or big gaps but they will do till i have the cash for some thunders. the bearings are hit or miss one is on its way to being blow out the others seem to be fine. I got to say i really like the wheels there was not much info on them but they are smaller and harder and i love harder wheels i hit a nice nolie 360 first try and the sound of the slide took me back to the good days. As for the board i cant judge it off one day of skating but from the looks of it its not a knock off. Here are some tips for buying a board online. find real skaters in the comments dont buy a board because a dad said his kid loves it. When you get the board go over all the parts and look over your board well make sure there are no defects in the board. make sure the board is not waterlogged a few taps should tell you. if you dont know anything about skateboards ask a friend to help and if you find any defects send it back right away. I hope the review helps you.
Each skateboard wheel is mounted on its axle via two bearings. With few exceptions, the bearings are the industrial standard "608" size, with a bore of 8 mm (or 10mm depending on the axle), an outer diameter of 22 mm, and a width of 7 mm. These are usually made of steel, though silicon nitride, a high-tech ceramic, is sometimes used. Many skateboard bearings are graded according to the ABEC scale. The scale starts with ABEC1 as the lowest, followed by 3, 5, 7, and 9. It is a common misconception that the higher ABECs are better for skateboarding, as the ABEC rating only measures tolerances, which do not necessarily apply to skateboards. Bearing performance is determined by how well maintained the bearings are. Maintenance on bearings includes periodically cleaning and lubricating them [1]. Bearings that are kept unmaintained have their performance greatly lowered and will soon need to be replaced. Bearing cleaning kits are commonly available on the market. The ABEC rating does not determine the speed or durability of a skateboard bearing. In particular, the ABEC rating says nothing about how well a bearing handles axial (side-to-side) loads, which are severe in most skateboard applications. Many companies do not show the ABEC rating, such as Bones Bearings, which makes bearings specifically for skateboarding, often marketed as "Skate Rated". Each bearing usually contains 7 steel or ceramic bearing balls, although other configurations are used as well.
GREAT board. Great design graphics. The boards deck has a real POP to it that makes it GREAT for tricks and a AWESOME beginner board. Only problem is It's super slow and requires a lot of work to maintain speed or to pick up speed period. A simple $20 wheel barring upgrade will fix that and BOOM PERFECT board, PERFECT caved in deck. Only 4 stars because of the lack of speed. I prefer my boards ready out of the box already pre-upgraded, but for the price, no point in complaining. Like almost all new boards, u have to ajust the wheels and the flex of the board to customize it to your liking. You won't regret it. But order it with some "Lucky" or "Red bearings" and your set.
We’re assuming if you’re trying to learn how to do an ollie, you’re probably pretty new to skateboarding. You may already know whether you’re goofy or regular footed, but if not, try taking a quick hop onto your board with the intention of rolling forward (you might want to try on carpet first so you don’t slip backwards). If you’re left foot naturally ends up towards the front of your board, you’re regular-footed. If you ended up putting your right foot first, you’re goofy-footed.
In 1982, while competing in the Rusty Harris contest in Whittier, California, Rodney Mullen debuted an ollie on flat ground, which he had adapted from Gelfand's vertical version by combining the motions of some of his existing tricks. Mullen used a "see-saw" motion, striking the tail of the board on the ground to lift the nose, and using the front foot to level the board in mid-air.[2] While Mullen was not initially impressed with his flat ground ollie, and did not formally name it, he realized it opened up a second, elevated plane on which to perform tricks.[citation needed]

go with friends like most do, or at least with friends that support what your doing. Im 26 yrs old,I am a solo skater in elk city Oklahoma and the skate community is small, but we have a park , but in the smaller community skaters clique up I didn’t grow up here so I’m left out. I learn a I can online and practice little bit s out of the day when I have time from both jobs I work, I just don’t get a lot of beef cause I ignore them and do my own thing , but I’ve noticed my tricks that I land alone fairly easy they get difficult in the presence of others for some reason Being standoffish and skate with a lil aggression you’ll be alright, just don’t give up man at all costs do not give up.
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