The ollie is a fundamental skill in skateboarding and is used to leap onto, over, or off obstacles, or over gaps of unfriendly terrain such as grass or stairs. As so many tricks depend on it - for example the kickflip and heelflip - the ollie is often the first skill to be learned by a new skateboarder. The ollie typically takes considerable practice to learn.


But, a quick warning! If you learn to ollie while standing still, you can develop some bad habits. Some skaters end up turning in the air a little, and not landing straight. You might not even notice until you try to ollie while rolling. So, if you practice while standing still, I highly recommend also practicing while rolling. Maybe only practice in one spot for a few days - maybe a week or two - and then give the rolling ollie a shot. That way, if you are developing bad habits, you can shake them off before they really mess you up.
My son seems to have a lot of fun riding this skateboard. He will be out there doing tricks for hours. One evening when he took a break, I decided to see if I could still ride. When I took off down the driveway, I could feel how smoothly the wheels rolled. I used to have to pay extra for wheels like this when I was his age. Lost in thought, I coasted faster, and my neighbour didn't see me when I shot out of the driveway. Even though this thing flew several feet in the air, bounced, and came to rest more than 20 feet away, it had no visible damage! Not so for me. I loved the skateboard, but am now recovering from two broken ribs, torn neck cartilage, and a cracked pelvis. Still, this board rides like a dream!
    Almost no one lands an ollie on their first try.  Repetition is the most important part of learning how to ollie.  Once you learn how to do an ollie, you can try doing them while rolling.  Learning is one of the funnest parts of skateboarding.  After you learn ollies, you can move onto 180s, Pop Shove-Its, and flips.  Soon a whole world of tricks will open up.
A rushed take-off might be the problem here. Steps 2-4 of this trick tip could help you out. In order to make your feet “stick” to the board, you have to do the movement fluidly. But don’t stress yourself out! You should rather start with some preliminary exercises until you feel safe while ollieing. It is also important to pull your foot up to your board’s nose in a straight manner to prevent it from spinning.

Choosing a skateboard deck can be approached in a few different ways: you can choose your board based off the graphic, the brand, the shape, the width, or even the color. For most skateboarders, it’s a combination of all these factors, but if you’ve never skateboarded before, you may not know what shape, width, or brand you like best. In this case, choosing your favorite graphic would make total sense.

GREAT board. Great design graphics. The boards deck has a real POP to it that makes it GREAT for tricks and a AWESOME beginner board. Only problem is It's super slow and requires a lot of work to maintain speed or to pick up speed period. A simple $20 wheel barring upgrade will fix that and BOOM PERFECT board, PERFECT caved in deck. Only 4 stars because of the lack of speed. I prefer my boards ready out of the box already pre-upgraded, but for the price, no point in complaining. Like almost all new boards, u have to ajust the wheels and the flex of the board to customize it to your liking. You won't regret it. But order it with some "Lucky" or "Red bearings" and your set.
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