It is a mini-cruiser, which is known for its strength as well as its ability to offer real value for the money you spent. This skateboard can also be expected to deliver an impressive performance – thanks to the Abec 7 skatro bearings used in it. There are also 59-mm urethane wheels and the 3-inch GOLD aluminum trucks that can help smoothen each ride.
It is a mini-cruiser, which is known for its strength as well as its ability to offer real value for the money you spent. This skateboard can also be expected to deliver an impressive performance – thanks to the Abec 7 skatro bearings used in it. There are also 59-mm urethane wheels and the 3-inch GOLD aluminum trucks that can help smoothen each ride.
Any serious skateboarder will tell you that the ollie is the most fundamental skateboard trick. In fact, it's probably the first trick that you'll learn on your skateboard. They’re great for getting over obstacles, moving around on your board, or just looking cool. Know the right way to move your feet on the board and with a little bit of practice, you can learn to pull off the perfect ollie.
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Hi, I can do an Ollie for 1 month already but somehow my Ollie is always unbalanced, meaning the front nose pops much higher than the back wheel. I understand that this is due to my front foot not sliding up higher, but I’m not sure how to correct it because my foot seem to get stuck after sliding up about an inch. Is it because of wrong technique or lack of calf muscles?
I just can get any height on my ollie at all! so frustrating!, i can pop the board nicely and get it off the ground like that, but then i try to slide my foot up the board and it just stays at that 45 degree angle from when i popped it, i just can’t seem to slide and get it horizontal in the air, or any height for that matter, i have watched countless ollie tips and tricks videos, and practised for hours on end, the same ollie, i can ride smoothly and fine, along the side-walk for example but i just cant get any grip to bring my board up and forward (i bought a new skateboard yesterday, and also new shoes) so its obviously me which is incompetent in completing this ollie! I know im kind of waffling on a bit, but i just can get the board to get any height! Please help if you can!
A skateboard consists of a deck, trucks, wheels, bearings, hardware, and griptape. All parts come in a variety of sizes, graphics, colors, and signature pro series. The deck is the essential part of any skateboard. The deck ranges generally from 7.5" to 8.5". Skaters choose their board size for many reasons, but the basic deciding factor comes down to style of skating and foot size. Transition skaters usually ride a wider deck, while street skaters tend to go with a smaller deck. Skate brands such as Girl, enjoi, and Welcome offer a wide range of boards in regards to sizes and graphics. Skateboard trucks come in either a high or low setting, and also in a range of widths. The main factors in a truck, are how well they turn, and how well they grind. Independent, Venture, and Thunder, are truck brands that are well known for their turning and grinding capabilities. The skate hardware is generally either Phillips head or Allen key bolts. The skateboard wheels range from 50mm to 60mm. Some brands offer smaller and larger sizes, but 50-60mm is the general range. Like the deck sizes, wheel sizes depend on the skater's choice of terrain: Transition skaters tend to ride bigger wheels, while street skaters usually go with smaller wheels. Bones, Spitfire, Ricta, and Wayward wheel companies all make wheels for any terrain, whether you're a street shredder or a park burner. Skate bearings follow the ABEC rating system, which includes grades 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9. Bones, Bronson, and Andale are some of the top bearing brands in the skate market. CCS proudly carries all these brands, and many more.
Longboard - A longboard is similar to a cruiser in terms of overall use and getting around town. Longboards start at about 42 inches in length and about 9 inches in width. When you buy a longboard, the wheel base of the trucks is usually wider and they have wheels starting at roughly 60mm. This gives you more maneuverability and a very smooth ride.
After that I went to my regular Olley spot to practice, fell so hard three times. My legs were so fucked up from the day before. Now I feel like shit because I had problem with a 20cm ledge I landed at least 100 times up and down yesterday. I’m even capable of 50cm ledges at slow speed, but I only get the front wheel and the board up so I have to put pressure on the nose to get it all the way up.
Hey, I’m a girl too and I’ve been skateboarding for nearly ten years now. I’m not a pro or anything, but I used to ride around in the local skatepark that was mainly just a big bowl that was fun to just drop into and cruise around in. I’m only just now learning street tricks. Anyways, I’d go there and the dudes would sometimes tease me, but sometimes they’d tease me about it. The thing you gotta do is not give up. Just ignore them. Dudes are stupid. Practice at home, by yourself, and learn some awesome stuff. So when you get really good, you can go to the park and if they start saying bad stuff, show off. It’ll blow them away. It always made me feel really good to show them that I was better than them right after they teased me for it.
When looking at skateboarding’s history, the only thing that’s stayed the same is the overall structure: every board consists of four skateboard wheels, two skateboard trucks, and a riding surface of some kind. And while we’ve come a long way from the days of metal and clay wheels, some aspects of skateboarding - like the brands manufacturing some of the most trusted products - haven’t changed at all. Independent Trucks has been designing trucks since 1978. Powell Peralta, the company responsible for Powell Skateboards, Bones Wheels, Bones Bearings, and the Bones Brigade also started in 1978. NHS, Inc., the company that produces Santa Cruz Skateboards, Independent Trucks, Bronson Speed Bearings, Krux trucks, Flip Skateboards, Ricta Wheels, Mob Grip, and OJ Wheels started in 1973. It’s no wonder these brands are still doing so well - they’ve been with skateboarding since the beginning. Since the day skateboarding went from something surfers did when the waves were flat to its own sport that involves technique, practice, and careful consideration, a small handful companies have been there to help skateboarding become what it is today.

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If a skateboard deck is turned over to its design side, there are two complete T-shaped pieces of metal. This piece is attached to the skateboard deck with screws. The pin is a long piece of metal that is designed to turn the skateboard deck. Adjusting its tension affects the skateboard deck's turning sensitivity. Typically, longboards have looser tension than other skateboards to allow deeper turns.
If you love skateboarding, then it is a must for you to invest in a high-quality backpack or bag. It is an essential gear, especially if you are someone on the go. You need it as it lets you bring all the things and items you need while you are riding to work or school – that’s possible while still ensuring that you bring your board with you all the time.
We've partnered with The Foundation for Learning and Youth Travel Education (FLYTE), a nonprofit organization that empowers youth living in underserved communities through transformative travel experiences. FLYTE teaches that we are more alike than we realize. By bridging the gap between fear and understanding, FLYTE empowers future generations by connecting them to the world.
Krown burst on to the skate scene back in 1996 with the idea to provide a high quality skateboard to the rider on a budget. Krown recognized a big gap between the $20 big box retail skateboard and the $150 professional grade skateboard. The boards at big box retail stores have plastic wheels and don’t even roll! Krown’s idea to bring a price-point skateboard to the market that actually functions as a skateboard has proven to be successful after more than 20 years. With more than 20 years of industry knowledge and knowhow, Krown is able to source the best parts at the best prices, which allows Krown to pass the savings on to the consumer. This expertise has allowed Krown to venture into the world of skateboards, longboards, helmets, pads, and even tools. Krown is the best place to start for beginner and intermediate riders!
When looking at skateboarding’s history, the only thing that’s stayed the same is the overall structure: every board consists of four skateboard wheels, two skateboard trucks, and a riding surface of some kind. And while we’ve come a long way from the days of metal and clay wheels, some aspects of skateboarding - like the brands manufacturing some of the most trusted products - haven’t changed at all. Independent Trucks has been designing trucks since 1978. Powell Peralta, the company responsible for Powell Skateboards, Bones Wheels, Bones Bearings, and the Bones Brigade also started in 1978. NHS, Inc., the company that produces Santa Cruz Skateboards, Independent Trucks, Bronson Speed Bearings, Krux trucks, Flip Skateboards, Ricta Wheels, Mob Grip, and OJ Wheels started in 1973. It’s no wonder these brands are still doing so well - they’ve been with skateboarding since the beginning. Since the day skateboarding went from something surfers did when the waves were flat to its own sport that involves technique, practice, and careful consideration, a small handful companies have been there to help skateboarding become what it is today.
Any serious skateboarder will tell you that the ollie is the most fundamental skateboard trick. In fact, it's probably the first trick that you'll learn on your skateboard. They’re great for getting over obstacles, moving around on your board, or just looking cool. Know the right way to move your feet on the board and with a little bit of practice, you can learn to pull off the perfect ollie.
This is how I learned how to ollie. Place your skateboard next to a curb, right up against it. This will help keep your board from rolling. Next, do everything that I just described, but don’t worry about what your board does. Just do it, and land up on top of the curb, on the sidewalk. Don’t stress about whether the skateboard will be there, or if you will get hurt – just go through the motions of ollying up the curb. If you do it right, the skateboard will be there. If you do it wrong, you’ll probably just land on your feet on the sidewalk. Here’s the key – just do it and expect it to work. Your body understands what you are trying to do, and the less you stress, the more it can kick in and fill in the blanks.
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