The most important thing when you learn to skateboard is to skate with people that are at a higher skill lv than you, then they can tell you what you are doin wrong. Its so **cing anoing when you skate alle alone, wondering why your board is turning, and you haw to go to the internet to find out that it is something so easy as ceeping your shoulders straight.
When I was about 10, I broke my first skateboard by riding it into a ditch. A decade later, in college, I broke another skateboard within an hour of owning it (surely a record) in a short-lived attempt at doing an ollie. (Surprisingly, the store accepted a return on that board even though it was in two pieces.) Then I was gifted a really nice, high-quality skateboard. The first thing I did with it was ride it down a big hill, a valiant but ill-fated adventure which ended with me jumping off the skateboard, rolling down the grass, and arriving scraped up, deflated, and rather disoriented near the entrance to my college cafeteria. (In my defense, the wheels and ball-bearings on that skateboard had been pre-lubricated to minimize friction, and why would anyone do that, that's just crazy.)

My son seems to have a lot of fun riding this skateboard. He will be out there doing tricks for hours. One evening when he took a break, I decided to see if I could still ride. When I took off down the driveway, I could feel how smoothly the wheels rolled. I used to have to pay extra for wheels like this when I was his age. Lost in thought, I coasted faster, and my neighbour didn't see me when I shot out of the driveway. Even though this thing flew several feet in the air, bounced, and came to rest more than 20 feet away, it had no visible damage! Not so for me. I loved the skateboard, but am now recovering from two broken ribs, torn neck cartilage, and a cracked pelvis. Still, this board rides like a dream!

Maybe you're new to skateboarding. We have lots of complete skateboards or longboards to get you started. All of our skateboard and longboard completes come fully assembled, so you can hit the streets without any of the hassle—try an Enjoi skateboard complete or check out our selection of Sector 9 longboard and skateboard completes. Or maybe you're an experienced skater looking to update and customize your ride. You probably want to start with the perfect skateboard deck before you do anything else. We carry high-quality skate decks to keep you steady and balanced while you bomb, slide, and carve the streets. We also have a variety of longboard decks in stock if you're looking for a smooth ride for cruising or commuting.
When looking at skateboarding’s history, the only thing that’s stayed the same is the overall structure: every board consists of four skateboard wheels, two skateboard trucks, and a riding surface of some kind. And while we’ve come a long way from the days of metal and clay wheels, some aspects of skateboarding - like the brands manufacturing some of the most trusted products - haven’t changed at all. Independent Trucks has been designing trucks since 1978. Powell Peralta, the company responsible for Powell Skateboards, Bones Wheels, Bones Bearings, and the Bones Brigade also started in 1978. NHS, Inc., the company that produces Santa Cruz Skateboards, Independent Trucks, Bronson Speed Bearings, Krux trucks, Flip Skateboards, Ricta Wheels, Mob Grip, and OJ Wheels started in 1973. It’s no wonder these brands are still doing so well - they’ve been with skateboarding since the beginning. Since the day skateboarding went from something surfers did when the waves were flat to its own sport that involves technique, practice, and careful consideration, a small handful companies have been there to help skateboarding become what it is today.
Slam your back foot down on the tail of your skateboard as hard as you can. At that moment, you want to also jump into the air, off of your back foot. This part is key and takes practice. The trick is in getting your timing right. You want to slap the skateboard’s tail down, and as it hits the ground, jump off of that foot into the air. Make sure to pull that back foot high into the air. It's a quick, snapping motion.
The DAPANLA deck is 7.5-by-31-inches in size, on the smaller side of good quality, real skateboard decks, which makes it ideal for smaller and shorter people. Unlike many decks on the market today, the DAPANLA deck comes with non-slip grip tape on the top. The underside of the deck is similarly decorated, with a range of DAPANLA designs including the fun cartoon avocado board that is sure to turn a few heads for its uniqueness. 
Get used to sliding your front foot up the length of the board. Once you’ve perfected lifting the front of the board up, use your back foot to hold the board in that position. Slide your front foot up the board towards the front, rotating it as you do so. The side of your foot just below the toes should grate along the deck of your board until it reaches the top.[5]
Level out on the way down – Before you start to head back towards the safety of the earth, level your feet out as the board begins to fall. If you’re trying to jump a gap on your board, this will help you keep going straight and maintain your momentum. Alternatively, you can land on your nose or tail and perform a manual out of the jump, but those are pretty advanced moves. Might want to wait until those little pink training wheels are off your board first.
This board includes professional assembly. All Krown skateboards arrived assembled and ready to ride straight out the box. The Rookie model includes heavy duty Aluminum 5.0 trucks, 52mm 99A high-rebound urethane wheels, precision speed Abec 7 bearings, high tensile phillips head mounting hardware, and 80 grit black grip tape. Each component meets the industry standards and are a common choice of skaters worldwide.
This board is an excellent option for beginners because of its simplicity and durability. The lightly concave design allows for simple turns but doesn’t require the rider to be an excellent navigator. You can start off riding this deck down the street and use it as you learn ollies, kickflips and how to drop in to a half pipe. It will withstand it all and look good doing it. 

Almost every skate shop will have a wall of boards that is either organized by brand, size, or alphabetically. At our CCS skate shop, we have multiple walls of boards that we try and keep ordered alphabetically. A wall of skateboards, at first glance, can be overwhelming, but if you know what size and roughly what brands you like, it should be fairly easy for you to figure out what board you want. Now would be a good time to mention our CCS Skateboard Buyer’s Guide, specifically the Decks Guide. In the CCS Decks Guide, you’ll find all the information you need to gain a basic understanding of skateboard decks.
Unlike some deck options, which are completely bare, the Bamboo Skateboards Galaxy Series Cosmic Cloud Skateboard Deck features heat-stamped artwork on the underside of the board, including several geometric and interstellar designs, including a beautiful nebula. Bamboo Skateboards claims these boards last their customers three weeks longer than other decks. The company sells the boards in three sizes: 7.75-by-31.5-inches, 8-by-31.75-inches and 8.25-by-32-inches.
If you’ve ever watched a skateboarder roll down the street and then all of a sudden pop into the air on a skateboard, you’re probably wondering the same question a lot of people do: how on earth do they do that? It almost seems magical how they just seem to explode off the ground, and then just kind of float. Skateboarder, meet, the ollie. It’s not in the category of “easy skateboard tricks,” but if you learn how to ollie, you’re well on your way to fame and fortune as a professional skater.
This can be tricky to figure out, so just take your time and relax. The first few times you try and ollie, it helps to not worry about this part. You will end up doing a sort of half-ollie, popping just a little in the air. Or, you might fall! But, don't worry, this is all part of learning. If you want though, you can certainly start with rolling your ankle when you try and ollie - whatever works for you! Eventually, you will need to roll and drag, and you'll figure it out. Just take your time!

The ollie is a skateboarding trick where the rider and board leap into the air without the use of the rider's hands.[1] It is basically the combination of popping, sliding, and jumping on the skateboard all at the same time. Originated in vertical skateboarding, and later on flat ground, it is not intuitively obvious how the liftoff is achieved, making the movement visually striking.
A skateboard is moved by pushing with one foot while the other remains on the board, or by pumping one's legs in structures such as a bowl or half pipe. A skateboard can also be used by simply standing on the deck while on a downward slope and allowing gravity to propel the board and rider. If the rider's leading foot is their right foot, they are said to ride "goofy;" if the rider's leading foot is their left foot, they are said to ride "regular." If the rider is normally regular but chooses to ride goofy, they are said to be riding in "switch," and vice versa. A skater is typically more comfortable pushing with their back foot; choosing to push with the front foot is commonly referred to as riding "mongo", and has negative connotations of style and effectiveness in the skateboarding community.
The Enjoi Whitey Panda deck features Resin 7 Construction. Resin 7 Construction uses 100% Canadian maple veneer with a specialized Epoxy resin Glue. These boards are individually pressed which helps insure you get the same concave and curvature in every deck - making your deck more consistent and your tricks more consistent. Why is it better? Compared to a traditional deck it's stronger and offers better pop and longer deck life.
The rider begins the ollie by crouching and jumping directly upward. As the rider begins to leap, instead of lifting the feet from the board, he/she "pops" the tail by striking it against the ground, which raises the board nose-first. Maintaining contact with the board, the rider lifts the front leg and bends the front ankle so that the outer or top side of the shoe slides towards the nose of the board. The friction between the shoe and the board's grip tape helps to guide and pull the board upward, while the rear foot only maintains slight contact with board to help guide it. When nearing the peak of the jump, the rider lifts the rear leg and pushes the front foot forward, which levels the board and keeps it in contact with the back foot.

Finally, just roll away. If this sounds simple, then great – get out there and practice! If this sounds too complicated, don’t worry. Just go slow, and take your time. There is no time limit to learn how to ollie – some people learn in a day, and I know one guy that took over a year to learn how to ollie on his skateboard. Also, like with most things in skateboarding, your body is learning how to ollie more than your mind is. So, with practice, you’ll eventually get it.
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