Place your back foot on the edge of the tail (this is where you will apply a burst of force to the skateboard) and prepare to exert force through the foot’s ‘big-toe-mound’ area. Place your front foot behind the front bolts. Make sure the weight bearing down on your feet, as well as the weight of your body, is generally centered over the ‘middle line’ of your skateboard.
An Ollie is basically an upward/forward jumping trick. The name “ollie” comes from the nickname of Alan Gelfand who created the ollie in 1976. The ollie was then modified for flat-ground use by Rodney Mullen in 1982, and it is this flat-ground version of the ollie which is most commonly referred to as the ‘ollie’ today. The ollie is arguably the most important trick in skateboarding because it is the foundation of the majority of skateboard tricks which require lift. When you want to do a trick like the kickflip, when you want to get onto something like a ledge, or down something like a set of stairs, or try handrails, the ability to ollie is a necessity. Therefore the ability to ollie high and with good control is critical to your total skateboarding skill-set.
This is how I learned how to ollie. Place your skateboard next to a curb, right up against it. This will help keep your board from rolling. Next, do everything that I just described, but don’t worry about what your board does. Just do it, and land up on top of the curb, on the sidewalk. Don’t stress about whether the skateboard will be there, or if you will get hurt – just go through the motions of ollying up the curb. If you do it right, the skateboard will be there. If you do it wrong, you’ll probably just land on your feet on the sidewalk. Here’s the key – just do it and expect it to work. Your body understands what you are trying to do, and the less you stress, the more it can kick in and fill in the blanks.
Get used to sliding your front foot up the length of the board. Once you’ve perfected lifting the front of the board up, use your back foot to hold the board in that position. Slide your front foot up the board towards the front, rotating it as you do so. The side of your foot just below the toes should grate along the deck of your board until it reaches the top.[5]
Cruiser - The name says it all. If you are looking to cruise around town then this is the right complete skateboard for you. These decks vary in length from between 20 inches all the way up to about 40 inches. The wheel diameters usually start at about 55 millimeters and use a much softer urethane than the previous Popsicle decks. These also come with all of the above but the decks do not always need grip tape. Some of the decks are plastic or composite material with grooves or gripping built directly into the deck mold. 
Bought for my 7yo's first real board, and for the price its perfect. Beginners look no further! Sure the trucks, bearings, and wheels are my choice, but as someone whose ridden for 20+ years, guarantee these items are way above Walmart status and are more than capable for you shred park or street. Bonus that it came no put together, can teach the little clone how to put it all together.
There are other types of ollies that you can do either alongside or combine with the ones listed above, like the tailgrab, indy grab, melon grab, stalefish, tweak, and dolphin nose. All of those skateboard tricks are performed more or less how they sound, but you might want to watch some videos on youtube to see a pro in action (as well as awesome cat videos).
The good news is that majority of skate shoes today come with high-quality flat soles that are capable of providing the maximum surface area designed to let you come in contact to the board, thereby promoting better control. Look for a really durable shoe, which you can wear comfortably to guarantee a safe and enjoyable experience when you are skateboarding.
To summarize, a skateboarder's feet need to do two things successfully to complete an ollie. They need to provide a changing force to move the board correctly (so that the combined force of gravity and the skater's feet add up to the green arrows above), and they need to provide different amounts of force with each foot (shown by the red and blue arrows above) to steer and turn the board into the right orientation.
In 1978, Alan Gelfand, who was given his nickname "Ollie" by Scott Goodman, learned to perform no-handed aerials in bowls and pools using a gentle raising of the nose and scooping motion to keep the board with the feet.[2][3] There are numerous references to Alan Gelfand's Ollie with most notably pictures in the 1970s skateboarding magazine "Skateboarder".
This is how I learned how to ollie. Place your skateboard next to a curb, right up against it. This will help keep your board from rolling. Next, do everything that I just described, but don’t worry about what your board does. Just do it, and land up on top of the curb, on the sidewalk. Don’t stress about whether the skateboard will be there, or if you will get hurt – just go through the motions of ollying up the curb. If you do it right, the skateboard will be there. If you do it wrong, you’ll probably just land on your feet on the sidewalk. Here’s the key – just do it and expect it to work. Your body understands what you are trying to do, and the less you stress, the more it can kick in and fill in the blanks.
A rushed take-off might be the problem here. Steps 2-4 of this trick tip could help you out. In order to make your feet “stick” to the board, you have to do the movement fluidly. But don’t stress yourself out! You should rather start with some preliminary exercises until you feel safe while ollieing. It is also important to pull your foot up to your board’s nose in a straight manner to prevent it from spinning.
Save time and avoid the hassle of setting up a new skateboard by buying a complete that we’ll build for you. Skate One offers a full range of complete skateboards featuring high-performance wood and composite decks, grip tape, bearings, wheels, trucks, and hardware suitable for men, women, boys and girls of all ages, experience levels, and styles of skateboarding. Whether you're looking for a classic re-issue, cruiser, funshape, longboard, mini, street or skatepark style complete skateboard, we have you covered.

In the case that you didn't gave up after a hundred over tries, you'll start to develop a reaction to landing it. After a few hundred more tries, you'll feel you are getting off the ground and getting little air. And once you reach the thousandth try, you'll already be doing it whilst rolling and the next thousandth tries will be spent on clearing small cracks n obstacles and working towards ollieng up bigger obstacles n up ledges.


This is how I learned how to ollie. Place your skateboard next to a curb, right up against it. This will help keep your board from rolling. Next, do everything that I just described, but don’t worry about what your board does. Just do it, and land up on top of the curb, on the sidewalk. Don’t stress about whether the skateboard will be there, or if you will get hurt – just go through the motions of ollying up the curb. If you do it right, the skateboard will be there. If you do it wrong, you’ll probably just land on your feet on the sidewalk. Here’s the key – just do it and expect it to work. Your body understands what you are trying to do, and the less you stress, the more it can kick in and fill in the blanks.
Today, many riders use the “ollie-pop” on more than just the flat-level surfaces in between other tricks, it’s used heavily in the half-pipe and bowl ramps to allow the rider to go even higher in the air. Performing the “ollie-pop” while you’re at or near the top of the lip is a great way to get an extra couple feet, which might be all you need to get that extra turn in and nail the 720 (or 900, if you’re Tony Hawk).
The ollie is a skateboarding trick where the rider and board leap into the air without the use of the rider's hands.[1] It is basically the combination of popping, sliding, and jumping on the skateboard all at the same time. Originated in vertical skateboarding, and later on flat ground, it is not intuitively obvious how the liftoff is achieved, making the movement visually striking.

A skateboard deck is made up of curved layers of wood that are combined with glue. Then, the skateboard deck is trimmed down to a board shape that is practical. Trucks are typically made of aluminum or other metal alloys. They are made by melted metal formed by a mold and later drilled into the skateboard deck. The wheels are formed the same way, but with polyurethane. They are attached by ball bearings to complete the product.
Ancheer 31″ Pro Skateboards are made of 7-ply maple wood and finished with anti-slip grip tape.  It includes 60mm PU wheels ideal for riders who want to carve out sections, obtain speed and higher off the ground for tricks. It features 6″ Tony Hawk Signature aluminum trucks and 32″ long deck with double kick tail which is ideal for perfecting your favorite tricks.  It comes with ABEC-7 skateboard bearings.  It has style and quality which is expected from the most influential skateboarders of all time.  It is one of the best-rated skateboards on Amazon with a rating of 4.8.

In the case that you didn't gave up after a hundred over tries, you'll start to develop a reaction to landing it. After a few hundred more tries, you'll feel you are getting off the ground and getting little air. And once you reach the thousandth try, you'll already be doing it whilst rolling and the next thousandth tries will be spent on clearing small cracks n obstacles and working towards ollieng up bigger obstacles n up ledges.

Hey Isak I’m a 46 year old Street Skateboarder recently started Skateboarding a few months back I’m trying to get my Ollies down I’ve stopped Skating for the last couple of weeks because I was getting frustrated with not getting my Ollies I was in a funk confidence slightly knocked so I’m thinking of going Street Skating all day tomorrow and not caring about what others think it’s all in my mind I know I can do this but may mind says I’m going to slam I skate alone but shouldn’t make any difference I need help with motivation somebody give me a kick up the ass you are never to old to start Skateboarding help dudes?! Mark UK. 🙂

Choosing a skateboard deck is a great place to start when building a complete skateboard. Unless you have experience riding a shaped board - something a little more retro or unusual, we recommend you start with a popsicle shape. CCS carries over 60 different skateboard deck brands that sell this popular popsicle shape. If you have questions on what size you should ride or have any other questions about building a complete, we recommend you check out our Skateboard Buyer’s Guide. Here, you’ll find helpful how-to’s for choosing a skateboard decks, skateboard trucks, skateboard wheels, skateboard bearings, and skateboard components. This guide explains every part of a skateboard and helps you choose which sizes and styles to best suit your needs.
With Enkeeo 22 Inch Cruiser Skateboards, you can cruise in style.  It has a dimension of 22 x 6 inches.  It comes with 3″ Black Coated Habitat trucks, Black 60mm Smooth wheels, and Abec11 bearings. It’s ready to ride and you can even personalize the tail of the board for free with a limitation of 10 Characters only. It has 30 days warranty and is manufactured in California.  It has a perfect 5 rating on Amazon.
Cheap Hoverboard Drones Drones with Camera Electric Scooter Electric Skateboard Freeboard Gifts for Skateboarders GoPro Alternative Cameras Headphones Hoverboard Laws How to Ride a Snakeboard Longboard Longboards Mini Segway Mopeds Mopeds for Sale Quadcopters Quadcopters with Camera Ripstick Rollerblades Roller Skates Self Balancing Board Self Balancing Scooter Self Balancing Unicycle Skate 3 Skateboard Skateboard Backpacks skateboard d Skateboard Decks Skateboard Girls Skateboarding Tricks Skateboard Quotes Skateboard Rack Skateboards Skateboard Trucks Skatecycles Skate Game Skate Logos Skate Shoes Ski Jackets Smart Electric Scooter Snakeboard Unicycle Scooter Vans Waveboards
Today, many riders use the “ollie-pop” on more than just the flat-level surfaces in between other tricks, it’s used heavily in the half-pipe and bowl ramps to allow the rider to go even higher in the air. Performing the “ollie-pop” while you’re at or near the top of the lip is a great way to get an extra couple feet, which might be all you need to get that extra turn in and nail the 720 (or 900, if you’re Tony Hawk).
It is mainly because those items are guaranteed to help you familiarize yourself with the ins and outs of using them. They are a big help in making you feel comfortable when you push off with your feet while also balancing on top of the board when riding. It is not good to go for a very technical product, so it’s best to choose the mentioned types first.
The wheels of a skateboard are usually made of polyurethane, and come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger diameters (55–85 mm) roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement and are better for transition skateboarding. Smaller diameters (48–54 mm) keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity which allows for a better response time, but also make for a slower top speed and are better for street skateboarding. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer "A" scale. Again like car tires, wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the "B" or "D" scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer medium-sized wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are harder (A 100/A 101). Vertical ramp or "vert" skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually slightly softer (A 98/ A 99), allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.
×