Radiate Ride Good Skateboards are made of 7-ply maple construction with epoxy resin glue. It features 356A heat-treated cast aluminum high performance 5.0 trucks with grade 8 kingpins and axles. The super high rebound 99A PU wheels with grooved running surface provide better traction and abrasion resistance. The Abec 5 high precision speed bearings offer precision performance and a smooth ride. It has an 80 grit durable color matched grip tape with transparency. It is completely assembled and ready to go. This product has a 4.3 rating on Amazon.
GREAT board. Great design graphics. The boards deck has a real POP to it that makes it GREAT for tricks and a AWESOME beginner board. Only problem is It's super slow and requires a lot of work to maintain speed or to pick up speed period. A simple $20 wheel barring upgrade will fix that and BOOM PERFECT board, PERFECT caved in deck. Only 4 stars because of the lack of speed. I prefer my boards ready out of the box already pre-upgraded, but for the price, no point in complaining. Like almost all new boards, u have to ajust the wheels and the flex of the board to customize it to your liking. You won't regret it. But order it with some "Lucky" or "Red bearings" and your set.
As you jump into the air, your front foot needs to roll slightly inward, and with the outside of your foot, you want to guide the skateboard as it flies into the air. Some people describe this as dragging the side of your front foot up the skateboard – that’s more or less what is happening, but what you are doing is using your shoe and the grip tape on the board to pull the skateboard higher into the air with you, and guiding the skateboard to where you want it.
I’ve been skating for about 3-4 years, I can kickflip, pop shuv it, front shuv, 180 and almost heelflips. I can ollie and used to be very good at them and could get them clean, but when I started practicing kickflips, it made my slide all weird. I can still ollie ( though it’s not as clean) but now when I ollie I slide with my pinky toe and that region, instead of the side of my foot. How can I fix my slide? When I try practicing sliding with the side of my foot, it doesnt feel like I can turn my foot that far towards the board and when I do it slowly to see what im doing, i still slide with my toes.Thank you.
Slam your back foot down on the tail of your skateboard as hard as you can. At that moment, you want to also jump into the air, off of your back foot. This part is key and takes practice. The trick is in getting your timing right. You want to slap the skateboard’s tail down, and as it hits the ground, jump off of that foot into the air. Make sure to pull that back foot high into the air. It's a quick, snapping motion.
It looks simple but yet complicated and vice versa. It takes most weeks to months to learn n some even years but a lifetime of effort to be consistent and be perfect at it and able to go higher, faster and further. It is not a feat you achieve once and it can be thrown out of the window if you want to continue to skate well. I've know skateboarders who just does ollies, boned ollies, ollie north and ollie souths, fakie ollies, switch ollies and nollies and nothing else but everytime he's popping them over 3ft height and up ledges, over gaps and down stair sets or over handrails. So no one's gonna argue on that even though he's not bustin some new fangled pressure flip late flip revert or something. He gets mad street creds for those huge ollies.
There are actually several types of skateboards but the most common ones are the longboard, cruiser, and carve skateboards. A longboard is usually at least 33 inches. It is a great mode of transportation and works well for cruising around. The cruiser also works well as a mode of transportation but many consider it more beneficial as it has a shorter skateboard, which promotes ease in transporting around.
Position your front foot near the middle and your back foot on the tail – The best position is for the ball of your back foot to be slightly hanging off, and the front foot more towards the middle. The position of the front foot can change, however, depending on how much air you want to get: if you’re planning on doing a monster jump, move the front foot closer to the back; if you’re just hopping a little bit, move it closer to the front of the board itself. Beware though, the closer you move it towards the back foot, the harder the trick is to perform.

Here we have an original Z Jimmy Plumer model. It has some handling scuffing from being around for several decades, but displays great. Grip has no holes at trucks which leads me to believe it’s never had any mounted. This is one heavy fiberglass mamma jamma. Get this piece of history at a fair price. I will throw in free priority insured shipping for the con us. Everywhere else at actual cost. Thanks for looking.
In general an axle width should be chosen that is close to the width of the deck it will be used with.[8] For example, a 7.75" wide deck will usually be fitted with trucks that have axles between 7.5" wide and 8.0" wide. (Standard truck axle nut size is 5/16"-24tpi UNF, and the thinner "jam" style with an optional nylon lock.) Trucks that are too wide can make doing tricks difficult and can cause the wheels to get in the way when the skateboard is being ridden. Trucks that are too small can be hard to maintain stability and can cause wheel bite to occur when turning.
The rider begins the ollie by crouching and jumping directly upward. As the rider begins to leap, instead of lifting the feet from the board, he/she "pops" the tail by striking it against the ground, which raises the board nose-first. Maintaining contact with the board, the rider lifts the front leg and bends the front ankle so that the outer or top side of the shoe slides towards the nose of the board. The friction between the shoe and the board's grip tape helps to guide and pull the board upward, while the rear foot only maintains slight contact with board to help guide it. When nearing the peak of the jump, the rider lifts the rear leg and pushes the front foot forward, which levels the board and keeps it in contact with the back foot.
    Almost no one lands an ollie on their first try.  Repetition is the most important part of learning how to ollie.  Once you learn how to do an ollie, you can try doing them while rolling.  Learning is one of the funnest parts of skateboarding.  After you learn ollies, you can move onto 180s, Pop Shove-Its, and flips.  Soon a whole world of tricks will open up.
Pull your knees up into your chest – How far you actually want to pull your legs up is totally up to you, but the higher your feet go, the higher your board will go too. By the way, the highest recorded preferred stance ollie-pop is 45 inches, done by Aldrin Garcia, and the highest switch stance ollie-pop is 40.125 inches, by Gavin Caperton. And if you’re going for endurance rather than height, the record for most consecutive hops is held by Rob Dyrdek, who did 215 of them in a row on his TV show Rob and Big. So those give you something to shoot for.
It’s not just standard deck sizes that are available for creating or replacing your board. You can just as easily get a great longboard deck to work on in your basement or garage. One of the best and best reviewed options out there is the Loaded Boards Poke Longboard Skateboard Deck. This standard-design longboard deck has it all to help you make the ideal board. 
The wheels are also impressive. Unlike some other skateboards that have wheels that are quite stiff, causing them to feel like they will lock up when you ride on them, the wheels in this complete skateboard for beginners are smooth and comfortable. These are also easily controllable, so rest assured that they offer a smooth and friction-free glide.
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