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There are other types of ollies that you can do either alongside or combine with the ones listed above, like the tailgrab, indy grab, melon grab, stalefish, tweak, and dolphin nose. All of those skateboard tricks are performed more or less how they sound, but you might want to watch some videos on youtube to see a pro in action (as well as awesome cat videos).

Unlike golf or tennis, skateboarding is a sport where there isn’t a difference between the equipment needed for men and women to compete together. Women skate, flip and bruise just like the guys they’re at the skatepark with. The only consideration women may want to account for is that people who are shorter or smaller often want a shorter board for optimal control. The DAPANLA Skateboard Deck is a great deck that is slightly smaller, but can do it all.  

The Krown Rookie Skateboard Complete 7.5 comes with thick, sturdy 7-ply maple wood deck. It gives you more control and permits you to perform various tricks. It features carbon steel ABEC-3 bearings, aluminum trucks, bushings and 54mm x 34mm wheels. This board is perfect for kids who are 8 years and older. It has a maximum weight capacity of up to 220 lbs.

The Krown Rookie Skateboard Complete 7.5 comes with thick, sturdy 7-ply maple wood deck. It gives you more control and permits you to perform various tricks. It features carbon steel ABEC-3 bearings, aluminum trucks, bushings and 54mm x 34mm wheels. This board is perfect for kids who are 8 years and older. It has a maximum weight capacity of up to 220 lbs.
Learn how to ollie off of a ramp: Ramps are a LOT of fun to ollie off of, but they are also a great way to break something if you don't know what you're doing! I have a cousin who almost lost his arm because of how nastily he broke it while ollying off a ramp. But don't let that scare you - if you know what you're doing, ollying off ramps is great!
Ohderii Skate Skateboards are made of a High-quality Plastic deck which will not easily break even when pressed over by a car.  It comes with 3.125″ all aluminum alloy trucks, 59mm 78A super smooth PU wheels and ABEC-7 stainless steel bearings.  It is ready to use and you can easily store it in your backpack.  It has an average rating of 4.5 on Amazon.
The ollie is a fundamental trick in street skateboarding, and is used to leap onto, over, or off obstacles, or over gaps of unfriendly terrain such as grass or stairs. As so many other tricks depend on it - for example the kickflip and heelflip - the ollie is often the first trick to be learned by a new skateboarder. The ollie typically takes considerable practice to learn.
It’s not just standard deck sizes that are available for creating or replacing your board. You can just as easily get a great longboard deck to work on in your basement or garage. One of the best and best reviewed options out there is the Loaded Boards Poke Longboard Skateboard Deck. This standard-design longboard deck has it all to help you make the ideal board. 
In 1977, skate parks began cropping up all over the place, including Skateboard USA, where Gelfand began to spend most of his time. His buddy, Scott Goodman, is the one who gave Gelfand the nickname of “Ollie” and dubbed his aerial lipside the “ollie-pop.” Pictures of Gelfand during this time period clearly show him getting airborne and performing the trick associated with his name today.
I’ve been skating for about 3-4 years, I can kickflip, pop shuv it, front shuv, 180 and almost heelflips. I can ollie and used to be very good at them and could get them clean, but when I started practicing kickflips, it made my slide all weird. I can still ollie ( though it’s not as clean) but now when I ollie I slide with my pinky toe and that region, instead of the side of my foot. How can I fix my slide? When I try practicing sliding with the side of my foot, it doesnt feel like I can turn my foot that far towards the board and when I do it slowly to see what im doing, i still slide with my toes.Thank you.

4 amazing skateboards in one nice lot. 1. 1990's Tony Hawk Conplete Skateboard, original falcon 3 design. With Rekon trucks and firelite classic wheels. 2. Sk8mafia Lucero deck. Signed by John Lucero. Brand new deck. 3. 1031 deck signed by entire team on a brand new creepy crawl deck. 4. Brand new super rare Big Mess deck with Blast design. This deck is extremely rare and is a must have for any collector. Both the signed decks are personalized to a guy named Jason that owned a skate shop here in Grant's Pass Or. Those guys were on his wall for a long time before he went out of business. If you have any questions or concerns please let me know. Thanks for looking. Steve


When I was about 10, I broke my first skateboard by riding it into a ditch. A decade later, in college, I broke another skateboard within an hour of owning it (surely a record) in a short-lived attempt at doing an ollie. (Surprisingly, the store accepted a return on that board even though it was in two pieces.) Then I was gifted a really nice, high-quality skateboard. The first thing I did with it was ride it down a big hill, a valiant but ill-fated adventure which ended with me jumping off the skateboard, rolling down the grass, and arriving scraped up, deflated, and rather disoriented near the entrance to my college cafeteria. (In my defense, the wheels and ball-bearings on that skateboard had been pre-lubricated to minimize friction, and why would anyone do that, that's just crazy.)
Go for the low truck profile if you want to obtain additional stability when you do flip tricks. It also works well for small wheels. The mid-sized trucks are good for all-around use, especially in streets and parks. You can also choose the high-sized trucks that are good for carving and cruising, which is the reason why they are perfect for huge wheels.
Maybe you're new to skateboarding. We have lots of complete skateboards or longboards to get you started. All of our skateboard and longboard completes come fully assembled, so you can hit the streets without any of the hassle—try an Enjoi skateboard complete or check out our selection of Sector 9 longboard and skateboard completes. Or maybe you're an experienced skater looking to update and customize your ride. You probably want to start with the perfect skateboard deck before you do anything else. We carry high-quality skate decks to keep you steady and balanced while you bomb, slide, and carve the streets. We also have a variety of longboard decks in stock if you're looking for a smooth ride for cruising or commuting.
A complete skateboard is pre-assembled - it almost rides right out of the package and on to the streets, ready for you to practice all your new tricks. You simply don’t have to think about buying the separate parts like trucks, wheels, decks or the likes. Once you have gained more experience on the board and you feel like customizing it to fit your skateboarding style, you can begin to learn more about the different pieces in order to assemble a skateboard that meets your specific wishes and demands. Until then, a complete can be quite the right choice.
Hey guys. I’m a girl and I am having some trouble with my ollie. I know the steps in order to do an ollie, but I can’t seem to do all of them. I can do a perfect pop on the back foot, but my problem lies in my front foot. (I am regular footed but idk if that matters) I know I just need to get my back wheels off the ground, but when I try to slide it, my foot just stays frozen. I try really hard to make it move, and when it does it just goes straight across, skimming the bottom of my shoes. Even then I can only move it half an inch. I have pretty mild griptape, that might change something? Idk.
We’re assuming if you’re trying to learn how to do an ollie, you’re probably pretty new to skateboarding. You may already know whether you’re goofy or regular footed, but if not, try taking a quick hop onto your board with the intention of rolling forward (you might want to try on carpet first so you don’t slip backwards). If you’re left foot naturally ends up towards the front of your board, you’re regular-footed. If you ended up putting your right foot first, you’re goofy-footed.

Today, many riders use the “ollie-pop” on more than just the flat-level surfaces in between other tricks, it’s used heavily in the half-pipe and bowl ramps to allow the rider to go even higher in the air. Performing the “ollie-pop” while you’re at or near the top of the lip is a great way to get an extra couple feet, which might be all you need to get that extra turn in and nail the 720 (or 900, if you’re Tony Hawk).
Skateboarding, in one form or another, has been around since the late 1950’s when the first brave pioneer first attached roller skate wheels to a piece of wood. As skateboarding progressed to mimic surfing, skateboards evolved with the style of riding. Skateboards grew and changed shapes as riders experimented with everything from plastic to fiberglass to aluminum constructions - all in an effort to push what was possible. Like most sports or art forms, progression is at the heart of skateboard innovation.
Invented in the late 1970s by Alan "Ollie" Gelfand, the ollie has become a skateboarding fundamental, the basis for many other more complicated tricks. In its simplest form, the ollie is a jumping technique that allows skaters to hop over obstacles and onto curbs, etc. What's so amazing about the ollie is the way the skateboard seems to stick to the skater's feet in midair. Seeing pictures of skaters performing soaring 4-foot ollies, many people assume that the board is somehow attached to the skater's feet. It's not. What's even more amazing about the ollie is that to get the skateboard to jump up, the skater pushes down on the board! The secret to this paradoxical maneuver is rotation around multiple axes. Let's take a closer look.

In 1977, skate parks began cropping up all over the place, including Skateboard USA, where Gelfand began to spend most of his time. His buddy, Scott Goodman, is the one who gave Gelfand the nickname of “Ollie” and dubbed his aerial lipside the “ollie-pop.” Pictures of Gelfand during this time period clearly show him getting airborne and performing the trick associated with his name today.
Now, I might not be able to skate to save my life, but I can do a little physics. So here's a thought - maybe I can use physics to learn how to do an ollie. Here's the plan. I'm going to open up the above video of skateboarder Adam Shomsky doing an ollie, filmed in glorious 1000 frames-per-second slow motion, and analyze it in the open source physics video analysis tool Tracker.
Slam your back foot down on the tail of your skateboard as hard as you can. At that moment, you want to also jump into the air, off of your back foot. This part is key and takes practice. The trick is in getting your timing right. You want to slap the skateboard’s tail down, and as it hits the ground, jump off of that foot into the air. Make sure to pull that back foot high into the air. It's a quick, snapping motion.
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