Learning to skateboard takes dedication.   If you want to learn fast, it helps if you have an order and a strategy.   Many new skateboarders try to learn to Ollie or learn to kickfliip before they are ready.  They will try to Ollie before they can effectively push their skateboard or even do a kickturn.   This often leads to frustration and even giving up.   So, for you parents and Noobs out there, here is an outline of some of the very first things you should learn to do on a skateboard.

In most cases, it is available in black but you can also find clear ones that are ideal for you if you want to show a specific logo. Another nice choice that you have is the die-cut grip tape, which works in displaying the color or design of the deck beneath it. Make sure to choose a grip tape at a size, which perfectly suits your skateboard’s deck.


Get used to sliding your front foot up the length of the board. Once you’ve perfected lifting the front of the board up, use your back foot to hold the board in that position. Slide your front foot up the board towards the front, rotating it as you do so. The side of your foot just below the toes should grate along the deck of your board until it reaches the top.[5]
Skateboarding, in one form or another, has been around since the late 1950’s when the first brave pioneer first attached roller skate wheels to a piece of wood. As skateboarding progressed to mimic surfing, skateboards evolved with the style of riding. Skateboards grew and changed shapes as riders experimented with everything from plastic to fiberglass to aluminum constructions - all in an effort to push what was possible. Like most sports or art forms, progression is at the heart of skateboard innovation.
After you’ve properly applied a burst of force to the tail, the top-side of your front foot’s toe should start dragging up your board almost automatically. Eventually, the higher you are able to bring your front foot during lift will determine the apex of your ollie, so work gradually towards lifting your front foot as high as your body allows. Skateboarders who record the highest ollies usually (somehow manage to!) bring their feet higher than their hips!
Before we show you how to ollie, let’s get familiar with the legends that brought this skateboard trick to the masses.  If it were a person, the history of ollie would start way back in 1974, when Alan Gelfand got his first skateboard from his father after his family moved to Hollywood, Florida from New York state. It didn’t take him too long to get the hang of it; he won the South Florida Skateboard championships two years later.
Slide your front foot as soon as you start jumping. Use the same movement you have been practicing to slide your foot towards the top end of the board, just as you jump off it and kick the back down. The front of your board should lift up as you slide your foot along it, with your foot hitting the top of the board at the highest point of your jump.[9]
Ride like the pros with Tony Hawk skateboards, Airwalk skateboards and boards from Razor�, Kryptonics, Maple� and other trusted brands. These high-quality skateboards utilize smooth-rolling trucks and ball bearings that prevent jams and freezing as you shoot through the half-pipe or roll down the sidewalk. And while performance is your top consideration, all your tricks and moves will look even cooler with a board that's splashed with bright colors, emblazoned with attention-getting graphics and made with a sleek design. Choose from styles with bold patterns and detailed, full-color artwork that showcase your personal aesthetic along with your athleticism.
Skateboarding is all about creativity and finding new challenges. A great way to explore skateboarding is to ride different shaped boards, wider trucks, and different size wheels. As you progress and start to ride new terrain and skate different kinds of spots, you may find one wheel size or board shape works better for you than another. There’s no wrong or right anything. There are no rules. Except for maybe one, and that is to keep skating. Skate as often as you can. Never is this more true than in the beginning while you’re developing your style and fundamentals.
Hey guys. I’m a girl and I am having some trouble with my ollie. I know the steps in order to do an ollie, but I can’t seem to do all of them. I can do a perfect pop on the back foot, but my problem lies in my front foot. (I am regular footed but idk if that matters) I know I just need to get my back wheels off the ground, but when I try to slide it, my foot just stays frozen. I try really hard to make it move, and when it does it just goes straight across, skimming the bottom of my shoes. Even then I can only move it half an inch. I have pretty mild griptape, that might change something? Idk.
The Fakie is almost the same thing as a regular ollie-pop, but instead of going forward, the skater is going backwards when they pop the board up in the air, usually performed when you’re in a switch stance. A switch stance is when your feet are in the opposite stance of how you normally would stand, like when you write with your left hand instead of your right (if you’re right-handed).
×