Are you on a hunt for the best skateboard on the market today? Then you are in the right place as this comprehensive article is designed to give you information about skateboarding and types of skateboards in general. By learning about the different types of skateboards and what each one can do, figuring out what works for you the best is a lot easier.
The official record for the highest flat-ground ollie is 45′ (114.3cm) by Aldrin Garcia during the “Maloof High Ollie Challenge,” held on the 15th of February, 2011. You can watch the movie here. However, a groundbreaking moment in the lore of the ollie will always belong to Danny Wainwright’s ex record of 44.5′ (113.03cm, ELEMENT-HIGHEST OLLIE CONTEST Feb.6th,2000.) Reese Forbes, a competitor of Danny’s in this contest, was also well-known as a master of the ollie.
Each skateboard wheel is mounted on its axle via two bearings. With few exceptions, the bearings are the industrial standard "608" size, with a bore of 8 mm (or 10mm depending on the axle), an outer diameter of 22 mm, and a width of 7 mm. These are usually made of steel, though silicon nitride, a high-tech ceramic, is sometimes used. Many skateboard bearings are graded according to the ABEC scale. The scale starts with ABEC1 as the lowest, followed by 3, 5, 7, and 9. It is a common misconception that the higher ABECs are better for skateboarding, as the ABEC rating only measures tolerances, which do not necessarily apply to skateboards. Bearing performance is determined by how well maintained the bearings are. Maintenance on bearings includes periodically cleaning and lubricating them [1]. Bearings that are kept unmaintained have their performance greatly lowered and will soon need to be replaced. Bearing cleaning kits are commonly available on the market. The ABEC rating does not determine the speed or durability of a skateboard bearing. In particular, the ABEC rating says nothing about how well a bearing handles axial (side-to-side) loads, which are severe in most skateboard applications. Many companies do not show the ABEC rating, such as Bones Bearings, which makes bearings specifically for skateboarding, often marketed as "Skate Rated". Each bearing usually contains 7 steel or ceramic bearing balls, although other configurations are used as well.
The wheels of a skateboard are usually made of polyurethane, and come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger diameters (55–85 mm) roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement and are better for transition skateboarding. Smaller diameters (48–54 mm) keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity which allows for a better response time, but also make for a slower top speed and are better for street skateboarding. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer "A" scale. Again like car tires, wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the "B" or "D" scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer medium-sized wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are harder (A 100/A 101). Vertical ramp or "vert" skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually slightly softer (A 98/ A 99), allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.
The Skatro Mini Cruiser Skateboard includes Abec 7 Skatro Bearings, 59MM Urethane Skatro wheels, and 3-inch lightweight aluminum trucks.  The Skatro Flexy Technology ensures optimal flex on every board. Skatro outperforms most of the leading brands and it has an amazing value.  You can take this board on the subway, plane, train, and even on the bus.  It includes a color matching T-tool.  It has the best rating of 4.8 on Amazon.

Invented in the late 1970s by Alan "Ollie" Gelfand, the ollie has become a skateboarding fundamental, the basis for many other more complicated tricks. In its simplest form, the ollie is a jumping technique that allows skaters to hop over obstacles and onto curbs, etc. What's so amazing about the ollie is the way the skateboard seems to stick to the skater's feet in midair. Seeing pictures of skaters performing soaring 4-foot ollies, many people assume that the board is somehow attached to the skater's feet. It's not. What's even more amazing about the ollie is that to get the skateboard to jump up, the skater pushes down on the board! The secret to this paradoxical maneuver is rotation around multiple axes. Let's take a closer look.


Skateboard hardware is used to connect the skateboard trucks to the skateboard deck. Skateboard hardware refers to the bolts and locknuts used when building a board. The bolts can have an Allen or Phillips head. Skateboard hardware comes in many different lengths, and often includes one different colored bolt so that the rider can mark the nose of their board.
Mounting hardware is a set of eight 10-32 UNF bolts, usually an Allen or Phillips head, and matching nylon locknuts. They are used to attach the trucks (and any type of risers) to the board. Some sets have one different colored bolt to show which side is the nose of the skateboard. Hardware is available in various lengths for mounting trucks with or without risers.
EXPERIENCED SKATER! This board is amazing for the price! (notice i said FOR THE PRICE) At the time of this review, the board was $44.40 and for that price the board i got was phenomenal. It is a 7-ply deck with aluminum trucks (havent figured out the bearings but they definitely feel like the abec 5 they claim to be). The trucks arent the best quality out there and the board can be a little thinner (maybe 5-ply) but the overall board is amazing. There are only two complaints. The hole in the wheels is a tiny TINY TIIINYYY bit off center, but nothing that cant be fixed with a new set. I can see what another review said by it not coming assembled, as a couple of the bolts on the wheels are a little loose, but the board does come assembled.
Popsicle - A Popsicle complete skateboard is typically between 30 and 34 inches in total length with a varying width between 6.0 inches wide and 9.25 inches wide. You can check out the deck size chart to pick the complete that will be best suitable for you. These decks all come with grip tape and are a more technical skateboard for tricks and for the skatepark. If you want to do more than cruise the streets, a Popsicle is what you are looking for. All of our complete skateboards include the deck, trucks, wheels, grip, bearings and hardware. They are all also fully assembled. When choosing a complete, typically the more expensive completes will include a higher quality deck, better and longer lasting trucks, upgraded wheels and a higher abec rating on the bearings.
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4 amazing skateboards in one nice lot. 1. 1990's Tony Hawk Conplete Skateboard, original falcon 3 design. With Rekon trucks and firelite classic wheels. 2. Sk8mafia Lucero deck. Signed by John Lucero. Brand new deck. 3. 1031 deck signed by entire team on a brand new creepy crawl deck. 4. Brand new super rare Big Mess deck with Blast design. This deck is extremely rare and is a must have for any collector. Both the signed decks are personalized to a guy named Jason that owned a skate shop here in Grant's Pass Or. Those guys were on his wall for a long time before he went out of business. If you have any questions or concerns please let me know. Thanks for looking. Steve
Pop the board in the air – The reason you jump up into the air in the first place is because you’re slamming the back end into the ground (don’t worry, your board is made to take the abuse). It’s the same motion you would do if you were standing near the board and wanted to pop the board up into your hands, except this time, you’re standing on top of it. As soon as you feel the board pop into the ground, kick your front foot up into the air at the same time. The timing on this is important: kick too early and you won’t go anywhere, kick too late and your board will fly out from underneath you.
Since its humble beginnings, Element was created out of passion and an unwavering dedication to making a positive difference. The tree continues to grow while it respects its deepest roots and embraces the landscape of skateboarding, and the lifestyle that surrounds it. From team riders to advocates, and product to marketing, Element is all inclusive, whose mission is to lead not follow, and leave an imprint deep enough, that it continues to make the world a better place.
In general an axle width should be chosen that is close to the width of the deck it will be used with.[8] For example, a 7.75" wide deck will usually be fitted with trucks that have axles between 7.5" wide and 8.0" wide. (Standard truck axle nut size is 5/16"-24tpi UNF, and the thinner "jam" style with an optional nylon lock.) Trucks that are too wide can make doing tricks difficult and can cause the wheels to get in the way when the skateboard is being ridden. Trucks that are too small can be hard to maintain stability and can cause wheel bite to occur when turning.
Velocity Boards Retro Skateboards is a complete 22″ Banana Skateboard.  It includes 6″ Lightweight Aluminum Trucks, High-Speed ABEC-7 Bearings, High-Quality Wheels & Bushings and Hardware.  It has a Unique Textured Waffle Pattern on Deck and is designed for Maximum Grip.  The Deck measures about 22 x 6 x 4″.  It has a 6″ Truck Axle and a 3″ Truck Hanger.  It has a maximum weight capacity of  176 lbs. (80 kgs.).  It is great for all skaters who are 6 years old and above.  It has an Amazon rating of 4.7.

    Almost no one lands an ollie on their first try.  Repetition is the most important part of learning how to ollie.  Once you learn how to do an ollie, you can try doing them while rolling.  Learning is one of the funnest parts of skateboarding.  After you learn ollies, you can move onto 180s, Pop Shove-Its, and flips.  Soon a whole world of tricks will open up.
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The wheels are also impressive. Unlike some other skateboards that have wheels that are quite stiff, causing them to feel like they will lock up when you ride on them, the wheels in this complete skateboard for beginners are smooth and comfortable. These are also easily controllable, so rest assured that they offer a smooth and friction-free glide.
Use of and/or registration on any portion of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 5/25/18) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated 5/25/18). Your California Privacy Rights. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices.
The wheels of a skateboard are usually made of polyurethane, and come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger diameters (55–85 mm) roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement and are better for transition skateboarding. Smaller diameters (48–54 mm) keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity which allows for a better response time, but also make for a slower top speed and are better for street skateboarding. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer "A" scale. Again like car tires, wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the "B" or "D" scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer medium-sized wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are harder (A 100/A 101). Vertical ramp or "vert" skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually slightly softer (A 98/ A 99), allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.
4 amazing skateboards in one nice lot. 1. 1990's Tony Hawk Conplete Skateboard, original falcon 3 design. With Rekon trucks and firelite classic wheels. 2. Sk8mafia Lucero deck. Signed by John Lucero. Brand new deck. 3. 1031 deck signed by entire team on a brand new creepy crawl deck. 4. Brand new super rare Big Mess deck with Blast design. This deck is extremely rare and is a must have for any collector. Both the signed decks are personalized to a guy named Jason that owned a skate shop here in Grant's Pass Or. Those guys were on his wall for a long time before he went out of business. If you have any questions or concerns please let me know. Thanks for looking. Steve
The DreadXBoards Concave Skateboard has Plastic Deck Injection Molded for excellent durability. It features Urethane Wheels 59mm 78a, aluminum trucks, and Abec 7 Bearings. It is completely assembled and is ready to ride. It is perfect for beginners or experienced riders. It can load up to 185 lbs. It is great for kids and adults. It has an excellent rating of 4 on Amazon.
The wheels of a skateboard are usually made of polyurethane, and come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger diameters (55–85 mm) roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement and are better for transition skateboarding. Smaller diameters (48–54 mm) keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity which allows for a better response time, but also make for a slower top speed and are better for street skateboarding. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer "A" scale. Again like car tires, wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the "B" or "D" scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer medium-sized wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are harder (A 100/A 101). Vertical ramp or "vert" skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually slightly softer (A 98/ A 99), allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.
The problem with wheel bite is that it tends to stop the motion of the wheels. This can result not only in a bad wipeout for the rider but also damage to the wheels. With the help of the riser pads, it is easier for you to preserve the deck of your skateboard since these pads can reduce the tendency of having stress cracks on where the trucks and deck meet.

But there isnt a magic key or secret. Skateboarding is suprisingly a lot of brute force. That is, there is no magic secret, it’s practice practice practice. If you wanna learn any trick, keep trying that trick. There are of course proper techniques and improper, but theyre nigh impossible to describe effectively. it’s all about feel and a lot of tricks defy description.


Made with bamboo and fiberglass, this board is tough, flexible and ready for anything. The construction is designed to feel and act like a snowboard. The drop-through design is perfect for freestyle longboarding, commuting, carving, pumping and more. It gives you better stability and more wheel clearance. The board is definitely best designed for carving but tricks and kicks are easily done as well.
As you jump into the air, your front foot needs to roll slightly inward, and with the outside of your foot, you want to guide the skateboard as it flies into the air. Some people describe this as dragging the side of your front foot up the skateboard – that’s more or less what is happening, but what you are doing is using your shoe and the grip tape on the board to pull the skateboard higher into the air with you, and guiding the skateboard to where you want it.
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