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Since its humble beginnings, Element was created out of passion and an unwavering dedication to making a positive difference. The tree continues to grow while it respects its deepest roots and embraces the landscape of skateboarding, and the lifestyle that surrounds it. From team riders to advocates, and product to marketing, Element is all inclusive, whose mission is to lead not follow, and leave an imprint deep enough, that it continues to make the world a better place.
The laws for skateboarding helmets vary from state to state. Many states require that skaters wear a helmet under a certain age, and some states like California make all skaters under 18 wear a CPSC Certified helmet at all times. CSPC skateboard helmets usually have an EPS protective liner that meets the safety standards for skateboarding. Make sure you check your state's regulations before ordering.
Hey Isak I’m a 46 year old Street Skateboarder recently started Skateboarding a few months back I’m trying to get my Ollies down I’ve stopped Skating for the last couple of weeks because I was getting frustrated with not getting my Ollies I was in a funk confidence slightly knocked so I’m thinking of going Street Skating all day tomorrow and not caring about what others think it’s all in my mind I know I can do this but may mind says I’m going to slam I skate alone but shouldn’t make any difference I need help with motivation somebody give me a kick up the ass you are never to old to start Skateboarding help dudes?! Mark UK. 🙂

Bought as a Christmas gift for our nephew. He's not an expert or anything so I was looking for something that would work while he gets used to riding one. When I received it I pulled it out of the package to check it out and the construction was good. The wheels spun smoothly and the grip tape was nicely put on. I don't know how it would resist to some board slides but for a 15 year old just starting out its a good board.
I just can get any height on my ollie at all! so frustrating!, i can pop the board nicely and get it off the ground like that, but then i try to slide my foot up the board and it just stays at that 45 degree angle from when i popped it, i just can’t seem to slide and get it horizontal in the air, or any height for that matter, i have watched countless ollie tips and tricks videos, and practised for hours on end, the same ollie, i can ride smoothly and fine, along the side-walk for example but i just cant get any grip to bring my board up and forward (i bought a new skateboard yesterday, and also new shoes) so its obviously me which is incompetent in completing this ollie! I know im kind of waffling on a bit, but i just can get the board to get any height! Please help if you can!
My problem is Everytime I try to pop the back it’s not hard enough and I get no air. The article says to jump up so I do it physically and sometimes it seems to help. But when I watch skate videos and other skaters It doesn’t appear they are actually jumping up. They just seem to be popping the board. So should I physically jump? May sound stupid but it’s something I struggle with.
The DAPANLA deck is 7.5-by-31-inches in size, on the smaller side of good quality, real skateboard decks, which makes it ideal for smaller and shorter people. Unlike many decks on the market today, the DAPANLA deck comes with non-slip grip tape on the top. The underside of the deck is similarly decorated, with a range of DAPANLA designs including the fun cartoon avocado board that is sure to turn a few heads for its uniqueness. 
It comes with a plastic board deck, which is small in size, making it ideal for riders who need a really sturdy skateboard. It is more suitable for both experts and beginners who want to learn new tricks in skateboarding. The fact that it is stable and small makes it good for kids, too. It promotes ease in riding and controlling it in a crowded street. This complete skateboard is lightweight, too, allowing you to carry it almost everywhere.

Learn how to ollie off of a ramp: Ramps are a LOT of fun to ollie off of, but they are also a great way to break something if you don't know what you're doing! I have a cousin who almost lost his arm because of how nastily he broke it while ollying off a ramp. But don't let that scare you - if you know what you're doing, ollying off ramps is great!
The wheels of a skateboard are usually made of polyurethane, and come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger diameters (55–85 mm) roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement and are better for transition skateboarding. Smaller diameters (48–54 mm) keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity which allows for a better response time, but also make for a slower top speed and are better for street skateboarding. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer "A" scale. Again like car tires, wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the "B" or "D" scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer medium-sized wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are harder (A 100/A 101). Vertical ramp or "vert" skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually slightly softer (A 98/ A 99), allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.
Are you on a hunt for the best skateboard on the market today? Then you are in the right place as this comprehensive article is designed to give you information about skateboarding and types of skateboards in general. By learning about the different types of skateboards and what each one can do, figuring out what works for you the best is a lot easier.
The wheels of your skateboard can greatly affect your ride in numerous ways, such as the speed, your ability to take control of the skateboard’s movements, and what you feel while riding the board. The good news is that they come in various sizes, levels of durability, and colors, allowing you to pick one that suits your skateboard preference and style.
Position your front foot near the middle and your back foot on the tail – The best position is for the ball of your back foot to be slightly hanging off, and the front foot more towards the middle. The position of the front foot can change, however, depending on how much air you want to get: if you’re planning on doing a monster jump, move the front foot closer to the back; if you’re just hopping a little bit, move it closer to the front of the board itself. Beware though, the closer you move it towards the back foot, the harder the trick is to perform.

The Wonnv Retro Mini Cruiser 22 inch Complete Skateboard is 22″ Light Up Clear Banana Skateboard.  It is complete with Light Up Board, Wheels, Metal Trucks, ABEC-7 Bearings, and High-Quality Bushings.  The set also includes 6″ Metal Trucks, High-Speed ABEC-7 Bearings, High-Quality Bushings, and Hardware.  It has a unique Textured Waffle Pattern on Deck and designed for Maximum Grip.  The Deck measures about 22 x 6 x 4″.  It has a 6″ Truck Axle and 3″ Truck Hanger.  It requires 2 AAA Batteries and is recommended for skaters who are 6 years old and Up.  It has a 5 rating on Amazon.

Get used to sliding your front foot up the length of the board. Once you’ve perfected lifting the front of the board up, use your back foot to hold the board in that position. Slide your front foot up the board towards the front, rotating it as you do so. The side of your foot just below the toes should grate along the deck of your board until it reaches the top.[5]


Made with bamboo and fiberglass, this board is tough, flexible and ready for anything. The construction is designed to feel and act like a snowboard. The drop-through design is perfect for freestyle longboarding, commuting, carving, pumping and more. It gives you better stability and more wheel clearance. The board is definitely best designed for carving but tricks and kicks are easily done as well.
The following descriptions cover skateboard parts that are most prevalent in popular and modern forms of skateboarding. Many parts exist with exotic or alternative constructions. A traditional complete skateboard consists of the deck (often with griptape applied on top to enhance traction), trucks (with urethane bushings), wheels (with sealed bearings), bushings, nuts and bolts to fasten the truck and wheel assembly to the bottom of the deck. Older decks also included plastic parts such as side, tail, and nose guards.
Finally, just roll away. If this sounds simple, then great – get out there and practice! If this sounds too complicated, don’t worry. Just go slow, and take your time. There is no time limit to learn how to ollie – some people learn in a day, and I know one guy that took over a year to learn how to ollie on his skateboard. Also, like with most things in skateboarding, your body is learning how to ollie more than your mind is. So, with practice, you’ll eventually get it.
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