A skateboard consists of a deck, trucks, wheels, bearings, hardware, and griptape. All parts come in a variety of sizes, graphics, colors, and signature pro series. The deck is the essential part of any skateboard. The deck ranges generally from 7.5" to 8.5". Skaters choose their board size for many reasons, but the basic deciding factor comes down to style of skating and foot size. Transition skaters usually ride a wider deck, while street skaters tend to go with a smaller deck. Skate brands such as Girl, enjoi, and Welcome offer a wide range of boards in regards to sizes and graphics. Skateboard trucks come in either a high or low setting, and also in a range of widths. The main factors in a truck, are how well they turn, and how well they grind. Independent, Venture, and Thunder, are truck brands that are well known for their turning and grinding capabilities. The skate hardware is generally either Phillips head or Allen key bolts. The skateboard wheels range from 50mm to 60mm. Some brands offer smaller and larger sizes, but 50-60mm is the general range. Like the deck sizes, wheel sizes depend on the skater's choice of terrain: Transition skaters tend to ride bigger wheels, while street skaters usually go with smaller wheels. Bones, Spitfire, Ricta, and Wayward wheel companies all make wheels for any terrain, whether you're a street shredder or a park burner. Skate bearings follow the ABEC rating system, which includes grades 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9. Bones, Bronson, and Andale are some of the top bearing brands in the skate market. CCS proudly carries all these brands, and many more.
The fact that it has nice and attractive prints also makes it a fashion skateboard. You can use it to show not only your passion in the sport but also your fashion sense. It is also equipped with a high-density emery surface known for being both waterproof and non-slip. With that, you have a hundred percent assurance of your safety when you are riding on it.
If you love skateboarding, then it is a must for you to invest in a high-quality backpack or bag. It is an essential gear, especially if you are someone on the go. You need it as it lets you bring all the things and items you need while you are riding to work or school – that’s possible while still ensuring that you bring your board with you all the time.
The wheels of your skateboard can greatly affect your ride in numerous ways, such as the speed, your ability to take control of the skateboard’s movements, and what you feel while riding the board. The good news is that they come in various sizes, levels of durability, and colors, allowing you to pick one that suits your skateboard preference and style.

A rushed take-off might be the problem here. Steps 2-4 of this trick tip could help you out. In order to make your feet “stick” to the board, you have to do the movement fluidly. But don’t stress yourself out! You should rather start with some preliminary exercises until you feel safe while ollieing. It is also important to pull your foot up to your board’s nose in a straight manner to prevent it from spinning.


In the case that you didn't gave up after a hundred over tries, you'll start to develop a reaction to landing it. After a few hundred more tries, you'll feel you are getting off the ground and getting little air. And once you reach the thousandth try, you'll already be doing it whilst rolling and the next thousandth tries will be spent on clearing small cracks n obstacles and working towards ollieng up bigger obstacles n up ledges.
Hey guys. I’m a girl and I am having some trouble with my ollie. I know the steps in order to do an ollie, but I can’t seem to do all of them. I can do a perfect pop on the back foot, but my problem lies in my front foot. (I am regular footed but idk if that matters) I know I just need to get my back wheels off the ground, but when I try to slide it, my foot just stays frozen. I try really hard to make it move, and when it does it just goes straight across, skimming the bottom of my shoes. Even then I can only move it half an inch. I have pretty mild griptape, that might change something? Idk.
After that I went to my regular Olley spot to practice, fell so hard three times. My legs were so fucked up from the day before. Now I feel like shit because I had problem with a 20cm ledge I landed at least 100 times up and down yesterday. I’m even capable of 50cm ledges at slow speed, but I only get the front wheel and the board up so I have to put pressure on the nose to get it all the way up.

So the proper foot placement for the ollie is with the ball of your back foot horizontal on the tail of your skateboard.  And your front foot centered on your board right behind the front trucks.  You may find that moving your feet around in different positions are more comfortable.  This is fine,  everybody can learn how to skateboard their own way.


The problem with wheel bite is that it tends to stop the motion of the wheels. This can result not only in a bad wipeout for the rider but also damage to the wheels. With the help of the riser pads, it is easier for you to preserve the deck of your skateboard since these pads can reduce the tendency of having stress cracks on where the trucks and deck meet.
Ollie 180: an Ollie where the skateboarder and the skateboard spins 180 degrees after leaving the ground. Both the skateboarder and the skateboard rotate in the same direction (Frontside or Backside) with the skateboarder's feet sticking to the skateboard. This trick is usually referred to as a frontside or backside 180, or less frequently and more popular with older skateboarders and/or when performed on a bank/quarterpipe, a frontside / backside ollie
Im a girl too. And here’s the deal. Guys wont bring you down unless you make a big deal out of being a girl at a skatepark. Go to a skatepark, skate until you want to stop, rock it, and stay confident. Guys could not care less whether or not you’re a girl who skates, and thats the bottom line. You just gotta learn to ollie perfectly and you’ll get to the point where you’ll be making their confidence falter.
The wheels of a skateboard are usually made of polyurethane, and come in many different sizes and shapes to suit different types of skating. Larger diameters (55–85 mm) roll faster, and move more easily over cracks in pavement and are better for transition skateboarding. Smaller diameters (48–54 mm) keep the board closer to the ground, require less force to accelerate and produce a lower center of gravity which allows for a better response time, but also make for a slower top speed and are better for street skateboarding. Wheels also are available in a variety of hardnesses usually measured on the Shore durometer "A" scale. Again like car tires, wheels range from the very soft (about Shore A 75) to the very hard (about Shore A 101). As the A scale stops at 100, any wheels labeled 101A or higher are harder, but do not use the appropriate durometer scale. Some wheel manufacturers now use the "B" or "D" scales, which have a larger and more accurate range of hardness. Modern street skaters prefer medium-sized wheels (usually 51–54 mm), as small wheels with lighter trucks can make tricks like kickflips and other flip tricks easier by keeping the center of gravity of the skateboard closer to the deck, thus making the deck easier to spin. Street wheels are harder (A 100/A 101). Vertical ramp or "vert" skating requires larger wheels (usually 55–65 mm), as it involves higher speeds. Vert wheels are also usually slightly softer (A 98/ A 99), allowing them to maintain high speed on ramps without sliding. Slalom skating requires even larger wheels (60–75 mm) to sustain the highest speeds possible. They also need to be soft and have better grip to make the tight and frequent turns in slalom racing. Even larger wheels are used in longboarding and downhill skateboarding. Sizes range from 65 mm to 100 mm. These extreme sizes of wheels almost always have cores of hard plastic that can be made thinner and lighter than a solid polyurethane wheel. They are often used by skateboard videographers as well, as the large soft wheels allow for smooth and easy movement over any terrain.
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