The laws for skateboarding helmets vary from state to state. Many states require that skaters wear a helmet under a certain age, and some states like California make all skaters under 18 wear a CPSC Certified helmet at all times. CSPC skateboard helmets usually have an EPS protective liner that meets the safety standards for skateboarding. Make sure you check your state's regulations before ordering.


I have been doing ollie’s for about a year to a year and a halve, but thats not the problem. My problem is the board turns when i ollie, i cant help it, i am starting to go into harder ground (ollying off ledges and ollying stairs) but i cant land and ride away because my board has turned in a 45 degree angle and it jerks me off the board, Please help in all you can, cheers mate.


Jump – Ah yes, finally, we have reached the move itself. Basically, you have to do about twelve different things all at once to execute a successful ollie-pop: lift your front foot, press down with your back foot, angle your front ankle,  and jump. Lift the front foot off the ground first, and then move your back foot. This whole process is easier if you’re actually moving forward – since you don’t have to fight for balance – but it can be done while you’re standing still as well.
After you’ve properly applied a burst of force to the tail, the top-side of your front foot’s toe should start dragging up your board almost automatically. Eventually, the higher you are able to bring your front foot during lift will determine the apex of your ollie, so work gradually towards lifting your front foot as high as your body allows. Skateboarders who record the highest ollies usually (somehow manage to!) bring their feet higher than their hips!
Bought for my 7yo's first real board, and for the price its perfect. Beginners look no further! Sure the trucks, bearings, and wheels are my choice, but as someone whose ridden for 20+ years, guarantee these items are way above Walmart status and are more than capable for you shred park or street. Bonus that it came no put together, can teach the little clone how to put it all together.
In the case that you didn't gave up after a hundred over tries, you'll start to develop a reaction to landing it. After a few hundred more tries, you'll feel you are getting off the ground and getting little air. And once you reach the thousandth try, you'll already be doing it whilst rolling and the next thousandth tries will be spent on clearing small cracks n obstacles and working towards ollieng up bigger obstacles n up ledges.
Before learning it, do have your riding basics down. Meaning you are very comfortable riding it around and doing kickturns and not be pushing mongo. Best to learn it whilst stationary with your wheels on a crack so that you don't move and slip out so much. I don't recommend doing it on grass or carpet cos when you pop the tail, it's gonna be absorbed by the floor and when you start doing it on pavement, your muscles will memorize a different way of doing it. So nope, no easy way out i guess.
Pull your knees up into your chest – How far you actually want to pull your legs up is totally up to you, but the higher your feet go, the higher your board will go too. By the way, the highest recorded preferred stance ollie-pop is 45 inches, done by Aldrin Garcia, and the highest switch stance ollie-pop is 40.125 inches, by Gavin Caperton. And if you’re going for endurance rather than height, the record for most consecutive hops is held by Rob Dyrdek, who did 215 of them in a row on his TV show Rob and Big. So those give you something to shoot for.
We’re assuming if you’re trying to learn how to do an ollie, you’re probably pretty new to skateboarding. You may already know whether you’re goofy or regular footed, but if not, try taking a quick hop onto your board with the intention of rolling forward (you might want to try on carpet first so you don’t slip backwards). If you’re left foot naturally ends up towards the front of your board, you’re regular-footed. If you ended up putting your right foot first, you’re goofy-footed.

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In 1978, Alan Gelfand, who was given his nickname "Ollie" by Scott Goodman, learned to perform no-handed aerials in bowls and pools using a gentle raising of the nose and scooping motion to keep the board with the feet.[2][3] There are numerous references to Alan Gelfand's Ollie with most notably pictures in the 1970s skateboarding magazine "Skateboarder".


The longboard, a common variant of the skateboard, is used for higher speed and rough surface boarding, and they are much more expensive. "Old school" boards (those made in the 1970s–80s or modern boards that mimic their shape) are generally wider and often have only one kicktail. Variants of the 1970s often have little or no concavity, whereas 1980s models have deeper concavities and steeper kicktails.[7]
Choosing a skateboard deck is a great place to start when building a complete skateboard. Unless you have experience riding a shaped board - something a little more retro or unusual, we recommend you start with a popsicle shape. CCS carries over 60 different skateboard deck brands that sell this popular popsicle shape. If you have questions on what size you should ride or have any other questions about building a complete, we recommend you check out our Skateboard Buyer’s Guide. Here, you’ll find helpful how-to’s for choosing a skateboard decks, skateboard trucks, skateboard wheels, skateboard bearings, and skateboard components. This guide explains every part of a skateboard and helps you choose which sizes and styles to best suit your needs.

A complete skateboard is pre-assembled - it almost rides right out of the package and on to the streets, ready for you to practice all your new tricks. You simply don’t have to think about buying the separate parts like trucks, wheels, decks or the likes. Once you have gained more experience on the board and you feel like customizing it to fit your skateboarding style, you can begin to learn more about the different pieces in order to assemble a skateboard that meets your specific wishes and demands. Until then, a complete can be quite the right choice.


The board is shaped like a cup in the center, and has whale tails on both ends, designed to make tricks easier to do. The blue stain on the board looks like the picture. It has a semi flat finish with no lacquer top coat. The underside is plain which allows the owner to add stickers and graphics if they want but they look great just the way they are.
Go for the low truck profile if you want to obtain additional stability when you do flip tricks. It also works well for small wheels. The mid-sized trucks are good for all-around use, especially in streets and parks. You can also choose the high-sized trucks that are good for carving and cruising, which is the reason why they are perfect for huge wheels.
The wheels of your skateboard can greatly affect your ride in numerous ways, such as the speed, your ability to take control of the skateboard’s movements, and what you feel while riding the board. The good news is that they come in various sizes, levels of durability, and colors, allowing you to pick one that suits your skateboard preference and style.
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